About Careers Internship MedBlog Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Bisphenol A Substitute Can Trigger Formation of Fat Cells

by Bidita Debnath on March 24, 2016 at 12:25 AM
Font : A-A+

 Bisphenol A Substitute Can Trigger Formation of Fat Cells

Exposure to a substitute chemical often used to replace bisphenol A in plastics can encourage the formation of fat cells, suggests a new study published in the Endocrine Society's journal Endocrinology.

The replacement chemical, bisphenol S, has a slightly different chemical structure than bisphenol A (BPA), a known endocrine disruptor. As of 2014, nearly 100 epidemiological studies have been published tying BPA to health problems, according to the Introductory Guide to Endocrine-disrupting Chemicals published by the Society and IPEN, a global network that supports sound chemicals management.

Advertisement


Concerns about BPA's health effects have encouraged some consumers to purchase food containers labeled "BPA-free". BPA-free products often contain bisphenol S (BPS) or other substitutes, but researchers have raised concerns that these replacements also interfere with the body's hormones and may pose similar threats to public health.

"Our research indicates BPS and BPA have comparable effects on fat cells and their metabolism," said the study's senior author, Ella Atlas, PhD, of Health Canada, the federal department responsible for helping Canadians maintain and improve their health. "The study is the first to show that BPS exposure can induce the formation of human fat cells."
Advertisement

The Canadian researchers created a human cell model to test the effects of BPS exposure. They used human cells called preadipocytes - undifferentiated cells that can develop into fat cells - taken from the hip, thigh or abdomen of female volunteers. Groups of cells were exposed to various concentrations of BPS during a 14-day period. For comparison purposes, some cells were exposed to the chemical dexamethasone instead because it triggers a known rate of fat cell formation and accumulation of lipids, or fat-like substances that collect in the blood and tissue.

Researchers found that the cells exposed to the smallest amounts of BPS as well as the cells exposed to the highest concentrations exhibited the largest accumulation of lipids, while moderate amounts had a smaller effect. Exposure to even tiny amounts of endocrine-disrupting chemicals can interfere with the functioning of hormones, since small changes in hormone levels are designed to trigger adjustments in metabolism, respiration, heart rate and other bodily functions.

"Since BPS is one of the replacement chemicals used in consumer products that are marketed as BPA-free, it is important to examine whether BPS acts as an endocrine-disrupting chemical," Atlas said. "This study shows that BPS and BPA have similar effects on fat cell formation, lipid accumulation and expression of genes important for lipid metabolism."

Other authors of the study include Jonathan G. Boucher and Shaimaa Ahmed of Health Canada's Environmental Health Science and Research Bureau in Ottawa, Canada.

Source: Newswise
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
What's New on Medindia
Test Your Knowledge About Chromosomes?
Eating During Sunlight Hours Minimizes Mood Vulnerabilities
Know More About the Digestive System
View all
Recommended Reading
News Archive
Date
Category
Advertisement
News Category

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Cholesterol Parkinsons Disease Surgical Treatment Diet Lifestyle and Heart Disease Cholesterol - The Enigma Chemical Liposuction Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) Quiz on Weight Loss Diet and Nutrition Tips for Athletes Nutrition IQ Top Diet Foods that Make you Fat 

Most Popular on Medindia

Indian Medical Journals Blood - Sugar Chart Calculate Ideal Weight for Infants Find a Doctor Loram (2 mg) (Lorazepam) Vent Forte (Theophylline) The Essence of Yoga Hearing Loss Calculator Accident and Trauma Care Iron Intake Calculator
This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use
×

Bisphenol A Substitute Can Trigger Formation of Fat Cells Personalised Printable Document (PDF)

Please complete this form and we'll send you a personalised information that is requested

You may use this for your own reference or forward it to your friends.

Please use the information prudently. If you are not a medical doctor please remember to consult your healthcare provider as this information is not a substitute for professional advice.

Name *

Email Address *

Country *

Areas of Interests