About My Health Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Many Patients can Benefit From Home Dialysis, but Are Currently Receiving Care in Dialysis Centers

by Kathy Jones on April 25, 2014 at 8:50 PM
Font : A-A+

 Many Patients can Benefit From Home Dialysis, but Are Currently Receiving Care in Dialysis Centers

A study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (CJASN) says that many kidney failure patients in Australia who could benefit from undergoing dialysis at home are being treated in hospitals and dialysis units.

This is creating significant costs for healthcare providers and causing unnecessary disruptions to patients' lives.

Advertisement

Home dialysis is more convenient for patients and can provide similar or better care than hemodialysis, which must be done in a clinic. Blair Grace, PhD (Australia and New Zealand Dialysis and Transplant Registry) led a team that investigated the links between socio-economic status and use of home dialysis (which includes peritoneal dialysis and home hemodialysis) in Australia, a country with universal access to healthcare.

The researchers analyzed 23,281 adult patients who started dialysis in Australia between 2000 and 2011. Among the major findings:
- Patients from the most advantaged areas were 37% less likely to commence peritoneal dialysis and 19% more likely to use in-center hemodialysis than patients from the most disadvantaged areas.
- Socioeconomic status was not associated with use of home hemodialysis.
- Rural areas were more disadvantaged and had higher rates of peritoneal dialysis, while privately funded hospitals rarely used home dialysis.
- Patients from the most advantaged areas were nearly 6-times more likely to use private hospitals than those from the most disadvantaged areas.
Advertisement

"We expected to find that patients with more education and financial resources were more likely to use peritoneal dialysis and home hemodialysis, as has been demonstrated in other countries," said Dr. Grace. "Instead, we found that patients from socio-economically advantaged areas were less likely to use peritoneal dialysis and more likely to use in-center hemodialysis." He noted that any non-medical factors-such as socioeconomic status-that reduce the numbers of patients receiving home dialysis are likely costing healthcare providers and disrupting patients' lives unnecessarily.

It's unclear why private hospitals in Australia rarely use home dialysis, and why patients from advantaged areas are more likely to use private hospitals. "More research is required to determine if patients from advantaged areas choose private hospitals knowing they want to dialyze in center, or whether they attend public hospitals then get directed towards in-center dialysis," Dr. Grace explained.

In an accompanying editorial, Gihad Nesrallah, MD (St. Michael's Hospital, in Ontario) and Braden Manns, MD (University of Calgary, in Alberta) stressed that socioeconomic factors and their correlates represent only one of many factors that have an impact on which type of dialysis a patient receives. They noted that "until new comparative effectiveness research and guidelines are available, policy makers and providers would do well to ensure that above all else, patients are given the opportunity to make informed decisions."

Study co-authors include Philip Clayton, MB BS, FRACP, PhD, Nicholas Gray, MBBS, FRACP, and Stephen McDonald MBBS(Hons), PhD, FRACP.

Disclosures: The authors reported no financial disclosures.

The article, entitled "Socio-Economic Differences in the Uptake of Home Dialysis," will appear online at cjasn.asnjournals.org/ on April 24, 2014.

The editorial, entitled "Do Socioeconomic Factors Impact Dialysis Modality Selection?" will appear online at cjasn.asnjournals.org/ on April 24, 2014.

The content of this article does not reflect the views or opinions of The American Society of Nephrology (ASN). Responsibility for the information and views expressed therein lies entirely with the author(s). ASN does not offer medical advice. All content in ASN publications is for informational purposes only, and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, drug interactions, or adverse effects. This content should not be used during a medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. Please consult your doctor or other qualified health care provider if you have any questions about a medical condition, or before taking any drug, changing your diet or commencing or discontinuing any course of treatment. Do not ignore or delay obtaining professional medical advice because of information accessed through ASN. Call 911 or your doctor for all medical emergencies.

Founded in 1966, and with more than 14,000 members, the American Society of Nephrology (ASN) leads the fight against kidney disease by educating health professionals, sharing new knowledge, advancing research, and advocating the highest quality care for patients.



Source: Newswise
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
News Category
What's New on Medindia
Contraceptive Pills in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) Curtail Type 2 Diabetes Risk
Mushroom May Help Cut Down the Odds of Developing Depression
How to Battle Boredom during COVID
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Acute Renal Failure Dialysis Kidney Failure due to Melamine Toxicity 

Recommended Reading
Dialysis
Dialysis is an artificial process for removing excess water and waste from the blood. Hemodialysis ....
Diet for Kidney stones
Diet for kidney stone should comprise of calcium-rich foods, increased fluid intake. Other dietary ....
Importance of Health Screening Tests
Health screening, along with a healthy diet and exercise, is necessary for good health and a higher ...
Kidney Failure due to Melamine Toxicity
Adulteration of food with melamine results in the formation of kidney stones and kidney failure, ......
Acute Renal Failure
Acute renal failure is the sudden cessation of the functioning of kidneys, that can be due to reduce...

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2021

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use