About Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Permanent Hearing Loss Caused by Cancer Drug can be Prevented

by Karishma Abhishek on May 15, 2021 at 11:56 PM
Font : A-A+

Permanent Hearing Loss Caused by Cancer Drug can be Prevented

Specific receptor in cells could serve as a key to prevent permanent hearing loss in childhood cancer survivors who are being treated with the drug cisplatin, as per a study "Toll-like receptor 4 is activated by platinum and contributes to cisplatin-induced ototoxicity," at the University Of Alberta Faculty Of Medicine & Dentistry, published in EMBO Reports.

Cisplatin is an incredibly effective chemotherapeutic when it comes to treating solid tumours in children, contributing to an 80 per cent overall survival rate over five years. But the problem is its side-effects of permanent hearing loss in nearly 100% of patients who receive higher doses of it.

Advertisement


It was stated that by inhibiting the receptor, they may be able to eliminate toxic side-effects from the drug that causes hearing loss.

The present study explored the very chemical composition of cisplatin itself for eventually identifying a particular receptor - Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4, involved in the body's immune response), that was getting turned on. TLR4 works by crossing the cell membrane, sticking a portion of itself outside the cell to sample the environment, and looking for different signals that indicate damage or danger of some sort.
Advertisement

Permanent Hearing Loss due to Cisplatin

The cells affected by TLR4's signals are located within the cochlea of the ear, where they play a crucial role in hearing, translating vibrations in the ear into electrical impulses. Cisplatin also accumulates in the kidneys, but the difference is that it can be flushed out and diluted in that area of the body; in a closed system such as the ear, it accumulates and damages the cells.

Hence stopping the signals produced from TLR4 that lead to the accumulation of cisplatin may help prevent the damage. The team thereby examined neuromasts, which are sensory cells within zebrafish that behave similarly to the human hair cells typically damaged by cisplatin.

The study proved that inhibiting TLR4 led to an inhibition of the damage on the sensory cells.

The team also works to refine an inhibitor that can disrupt this sampling process, removing the function that causes the toxic side-effect while still keeping the immune sensor function intact so patients don't become immunocompromised.

These findings thereby may help open the door for potential therapeutics in cancer and cisplatin-induced ototoxicity.

Source: Medindia
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
What's New on Medindia
COVID Toes
International Yoga Day 2022 - 'Yoga for Humanity'
Wearable Devices Are Now Transforming Depression, Multiple Sclerosis, and Epilepsy Management.
View all
Recommended Reading
News Archive
Date
Category
Advertisement
News Category

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Drug Toxicity Tinnitus Presbycusis Cancer and Homeopathy Signature Drug Toxicity Cancer Facts Cancer Tattoos A Body Art Acoustic Neuroma Meniere’s Disease 

Most Popular on Medindia

Blood Donation - Recipients Daily Calorie Requirements Hearing Loss Calculator Noscaphene (Noscapine) Find a Doctor Blood - Sugar Chart Accident and Trauma Care The Essence of Yoga Turmeric Powder - Health Benefits, Uses & Side Effects Drug - Food Interactions

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2022

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use