About Careers Internship MedBlog Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Novel Mechanism That Could Lead to Therapies for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

by Dr. Trupti Shirole on October 5, 2016 at 10:05 PM
Font : A-A+

 Novel Mechanism That Could Lead to Therapies for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, is a fatal neurodegenerative disease that causes death of motor neurons, which control voluntary muscles. Progressive weakness and paralysis due to muscle atrophy lead to difficulty in speaking, swallowing and eventually breathing. The disease typically starts between ages 40 and 60, and the average survival from onset to death is two to five years.

Researchers from Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) have published a new study that describes a novel molecular mechanism that could lead to the development of new therapies for ALS. The study was published online in the prestigious PNAS (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America).

Advertisement


The cause of ALS is not known in about 90% of cases, but approximately 10% are genetically inherited. Approximately 20% of these genetic cases are caused by mutations in the SOD1 gene (superoxide dismutase), which lead to the accumulation of "misfolded" SOD1 proteins that provoke selective killing of motor neurons.

"Correct protein folding is critically important, which is why we are focusing on the diverse set of complex cellular mechanisms, including molecular chaperones, that promote efficient folding and prevent toxicity," says Dr. Adrian Israelson, who heads the Cellular and Molecular Neurodegeneration Lab in the BGU Department of Physiology and Cell Biology.
Advertisement

For the first time, this study reported that "endogenous multifunctional protein macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF)," a gene that regulates cell inflammation and immunity, acts as a chaperone for misfolded SOD1 in a mouse model. The researchers demonstrated that completely eliminating MIF in a mutant SOD1 mouse model of familial ALS increased misfolded SOD1 accumulation. This also accelerated disease onset and late disease progression and shortened the lifespan of mice expressing mutant SOD1.

"This study provides insight into the potential therapeutic role of MIF in suppressing the selective accumulation of misfolded SOD1 in ALS by modulating MIF levels," Dr. Israelson says.

Source: Newswise
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
What's New on Medindia
Alarming Cesarean Section Trends in India - Convenience or Compulsion of Corporate Healthcare
Quiz on Low-Calorie Diet for Diabetes
World Heart Day in 2022- Use Heart for Every Heart
View all
News Archive
Date
Category
Advertisement
News Category

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) 

Most Popular on Medindia

Accident and Trauma Care Find a Hospital Selfie Addiction Calculator Color Blindness Calculator Blood Donation - Recipients Daily Calorie Requirements Nutam (400mg) (Piracetam) Loram (2 mg) (Lorazepam) Diaphragmatic Hernia Drug Interaction Checker
This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use
×

Novel Mechanism That Could Lead to Therapies for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Personalised Printable Document (PDF)

Please complete this form and we'll send you a personalised information that is requested

You may use this for your own reference or forward it to your friends.

Please use the information prudently. If you are not a medical doctor please remember to consult your healthcare provider as this information is not a substitute for professional advice.

Name *

Email Address *

Country *

Areas of Interests