About My Health Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Five Subgroups of Atopic Eczema Newly Identified

by Julia Samuel on November 22, 2017 at 2:43 PM
Font : A-A+

Five Subgroups of  Atopic Eczema Newly Identified

Doctors and patients have long known that the itchy skin condition can affect people in many different ways. Now Professor Sara Brown from the University of Dundee and collaborators at the University of Bristol and the University of Groningen, Netherlands, have shown for the first time that there are atopic dermatitis subgroups in children.

Professor Brown said: "This research study has confirmed that eczema is a very diverse disease, and it's provided evidence of distinctly different trajectories, including a group that hadn't previously been recognised, in whom eczema develops for the first time around six years of age and is often associated with asthma.

Advertisement


"We've also shown that genetic risk factors contribute to the most troublesome and long-lasting eczema, so these patients can be our focus for future research to improve care. It's also important evidence that we need to consider which subtypes of eczema may respond to which treatments in clinical trials to ensure the right children get the right treatment in future."

The researchers looked at 13,500 children from birth to 11 or 16 years, born in the UK or Netherlands. Around 40 per cent of children developed eczema at some time in their life. Through statistical analysis, the researchers were able to identify different groups including children whose eczema begins in infancy but then resolves, as different from children whose eczema starts later or becomes a long-term problem.
Advertisement

The groups were defined as:

  • Eczema starts in infancy and doesn't go away
  • Eczema starts in infancy and lasts throughout childhood
  • Eczema starts in infancy and goes away in early childhood
  • Eczema starts in mid-childhood (around 6 years) and goes away later in childhood
  • Eczema starts in late childhood (11 years-early teens) and then goes away
The largest group, approximately one-third of children with eczema, develop the disease soon after birth and mostly grow out of it by their fifth birthday. However, for the one in eight children with eczema who are in a group where eczema does not resolve, the disease can last into adulthood. These children are also most likely to have relatives with eczema and experience other health problems, including asthma and allergies.

Dr Lavinia Paternoster, Senior Lecturer in Genetic Epidemiology from Bristol Medical School: Population Health Sciences, who initiated the study, said: "This study brought together two European birth cohorts, PIAMA, from the Netherlands and ALSPAC (or 'Children of the 90s') from Bristol.

"The patterns of disease observed in these two cohorts were remarkably similar, which gives us greater confidence in the results.

"We've found some evidence of what might cause children to suffer from different subtypes of eczema, but we still need to do a lot more work to understand this further and work out how we can use this information in the clinic to better help patients."

Mrs Magali Redding, CEO of Eczema Outreach Scotland, added: "This is a fantastic step forward for research on eczema in children. Families are desperate for clues about their specific circumstances and hope for the future.

"To families of children suffering from eczema, research results like this paper on sub-groups of patients provide much needed hope for a clearer prognosis and ultimately better treatments.

"The impact of atopic dermatitis on people's quality of life can be devastating. With this chronic condition on the increase, the work of Professor Sara Brown and her academic colleagues is crucial and always welcome by our members."

Source: Eurekalert
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Advertisement
News Category
What's New on Medindia
Turmeric: Magic Ingredient to Keep you Healthy in Winter
Top 7 Benefits of Good Oral Hygiene
Healthy and Safer Thanksgiving 2021
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Allergy Skin Disorder Atopic Dermatitis Types of Food Allergies Eczema: Miracles with Homeopathy Contact Dermatitis 

Recommended Reading
Atopic Dermatitis
Atopic dermatitis is an inflammatory, non-contagious, chronic skin disorder that involves scaly and ...
Eczema: Miracles with Homeopathy
Eczema is a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by severe itching, redness, scaling and ...
Contact Dermatitis
Contact Dermatitis is a reaction of the skin in the form of skin rashes on coming into contact with ...
Dry Skin/Xerosis
Dry skin/xerosis is a common skin condition that causes fine flakes and dry skin patches. Use of ......
Allergy
An allergy is a hypersensitive disorder of immune system. Substances that often cause allergic react...
Skin Disorder
Skin types can range from oily to dry, extreme dryness accompanied by rashes and itching can often d...
Types of Food Allergies
If you are allergic to certain food items-Watch out for what you eat...

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2021

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use