Depression, Sleep Disorders More Common in Men with Urological Problems

by Adeline Dorcas on  September 1, 2018 at 3:12 PM Research News
RSS Email Print This Page Comment bookmark
Font : A-A+

Urological problems in men are often associated with depression and sleep disorders, reports a new study.

Men who suffer from urological problems such as erectile dysfunction, urinary tract and bladder problems or infertility issues often also suffer from depression and sleep disorders.
Depression, Sleep Disorders More Common in Men with Urological Problems
Depression, Sleep Disorders More Common in Men with Urological Problems

Physicians should, therefore, be aware of these risks so that they can refer their patients to relevant specialists and provide comprehensive and timely care for male patients. This is according to Arman Walia of the University of California Irvine in the US, in a study in the Springer Nature-branded IJIR: Your Sexual Medicine Journal.

As part of the study, 124 patients visiting a Men's Health clinic in the US completed three urological questionnaires. These asked whether they had prostate issues or suffered from erectile dysfunction and whether these were age-related. They also filled in four other questionnaires about their general health and sleeping habits, including whether they suffered from insomnia, sleepiness or sleep apnea.

Walia and his team evaluated these questionnaires together with information about the participants' medical history and specific laboratory test results. The men involved in the study were on average 54 years old.

Overall, the study identified associations between urologic disease and sleep and mood complaints in patients presenting to a Men's Health clinic. Depression, insomnia and sleep apnea were commonplace and were particularly prevalent in older patients, those who were overweight or suffered from lower urinary tract symptoms. These problems were also common among patients who had hypogonadism which is where the body does not produce enough of the male hormone testosterone.

Three in every four participants were overweight, while 22.5 percent suffered from hypertension, 15 percent had heart problems, and 13.3 percent were diabetic. Two in every five men were mild to severely depressed or had prostate problems. One in every two patients suffered from sleep apnea or mild to severe erectile problems. Lower levels of male sex hormones were measured in four out of every five men.

"When addressing the entirety of a patient's disease burden, a practicing urologist should take into account these associations while evaluating a patient, particularly because the non-urologic disease may negatively impact urologic disease," says Walia.

"Urologists are not specifically trained in sleep medicine or how to manage depression, and therefore should have an appropriate threshold for referral," he notes.

"This underscores the importance of screening for conditions, thereby preventing patients from slipping through the cracks and being able to more accurately identify those in need of further intervention."

Source: Eurekalert

Post a Comment

Comments should be on the topic and should not be abusive. The editorial team reserves the right to review and moderate the comments posted on the site.
Notify me when reply is posted
I agree to the terms and conditions
Advertisement

Recommended Reading

More News on:

Parasomnias - Part II Snoring Sleep Disorder : Restless Legs Syndrome Sleep Disorder: Sleepwalking Periodic Limb Movement Disorder Circadian Rhythm Sleep Disorders Sleep Eating Disorders REM Behavior Disorder Sleep Disturbances In Women Sleep 

News A - Z

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

News Search

Medindia Newsletters

Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!

Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

Find a Doctor

Stay Connected

  • Available on the Android Market
  • Available on the App Store

News Category

News Archive