Medindia
Advertisement

Artificial Throat Could One Day Enable Mute People Speak

by Adeline Dorcas on July 25, 2019 at 12:56 PM

Artificial Throat Could One Day Enable Mute People Speak

Newly developed wearable artificial graphene throat (WAGT) can help mute people to speak, reports a new study. The findings of the study are published in the journal ACS Nano.

Most people take speech for granted, but it's actually a complex process that involves both motions of the mouth and vibrations of folded tissues, called vocal cords, within the throat. If the vocal cords sustain injuries or other lesions, a person can lose the ability to speak. Now, researchers have developed a wearable artificial throat that, when attached to the neck like a temporary tattoo, can transform throat movements into sounds.

Advertisement


Scientists have developed detectors that measure movements on human skin, such as a pulse or heartbeat. However, the devices typically can't convert these motions into sounds. Recently, He Tian, Yi Yang, Tian-Ling Ren, and colleagues developed a prototype artificial throat with both capabilities, but because the device needed to be taped to the skin, it wasn't comfortable enough to wear for long periods of time. So the researchers wanted to develop a thinner, skin-like artificial throat that would adhere to the neck like a temporary tattoo.

To make their artificial throat, the researchers laser-scribed graphene on a thin sheet of polyvinyl alcohol film. The flexible device measured 0.6 by 1.2 inches, or about double the size of a person's thumbnail.
Advertisement

The research team used water to attach the film to the skin over a volunteer's throat and connected it with electrodes to a small armband that contained a circuit board, microcomputer, power amplifier, and decoder. When the volunteer noiselessly imitated the throat motions of speech, the instrument converted these movements into emitted sounds, such as the words "OK" and "No." The researchers say that, in the future, mute people could be trained to generate signals with their throats that the device would translate into speech.

Source: Eurekalert
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
News Category
What's New on Medindia
'Hybrid Immunity' may Help Elude COVID-19 Pandemic
Stroop Effect
Plant-Based Diet may Reduce the Risk of COVID-19
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Laryngeal Cancer Strep Throat Difficulty in Swallowing or Lump in the Throat (Dysphagia) Symptom 

Recommended Reading
Smart Speaker Technology Could Help Physicians for Medical Treatments
Smart speakers that are customarily used in living rooms can be programmed to act as an aid to ......
Translating Brain Signals into Speech Sounds May Help People Who Can't Speak
Turning brain signals into speech sounds may help paralyzed patients who can't speak, reveals a new ...
New System That Translates Brain Signals Directly into Speech Created
The breakthrough technology which harnesses the power of speech synthesizers and artificial ......
Apraxia: New Developments Into The Speech Disorder Found
New insights into a severe child speech impediment called apraxia has been found....
Difficulty in Swallowing or Lump in the Throat (Dysphagia) Symptom
What are types of lumps in throat and what causes them? Can they be a sign or symptom of something m...
Laryngeal Cancer
Laryngeal cancer is also called cancer of the larynx or throat cancer or laryngeal carcinoma. It usu...
Strep Throat
Strep Throat is a bacterial infection caused by Group A beta hemolytic streptococci. It affects most...

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2021

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use