Tackling the Complications of Diabetes in India

by Hannah Joy on  October 19, 2018 at 9:20 AM Diabetes News
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India has over 73 million living with diabetes and the total number is expected to more than double within a decade. To create awareness among people, the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) is hosting the first IDF Diabetes Complications Congress on October 25-27, 2018 in Hyderabad, India.
Tackling the Complications of Diabetes in India
Tackling the Complications of Diabetes in India

A serious concern is that more than half of all people with diabetes in the region are undiagnosed, placing them at high risk of developing the severe and life-threatening complications associated with diabetes.

If left untreated or diagnosed late, diabetes can result in disabling complications and place additional strain on national healthcare systems already struggling to cope with the demands of a growing population.

To increase awareness and knowledge of the disease and its associated complications among health professionals the International Diabetes Federation is hosting its first ever Diabetes Complications Congress on October 25-27 2018 in Hyderabad, India.

According to the International Diabetes Federation, more than 425 million people have diabetes worldwide. That is approaching 10% of the global adult population. India is at the forefront of the epidemic, with over 73 million living with diabetes, second only to China in terms of numbers.

Diabetes is the fastest- growing disease in the country. The total number is expected to more than double within a decade. A cause of alarm is that over half of all people living with diabetes in India are undiagnosed, placing them at high risk of developing the severe and life-threatening complications associated with diabetes.

Type 2 diabetes accounts for about 90% of all diabetes. Its rapid rise is driven by unhealthy diets and inactive lifestyles. In India, economic growth and the widespread availability of cheaper, more processed foods has resulted in a significant shift away from traditional home-cooked meals, to the consumption of shop-bought convenience food, irrespective of family income. This has left India fighting a lifestyle disease.

If left untreated or diagnosed late, diabetes can result in disabling complications.

  • Diabetes is one of the leading causes of cardiovascular disease, with one out of four diabetes hospitalisation costs a consequence of cardiovascular complications.
  • Diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of vision loss in adults of working-age.
  • End-stage kidney disease is up to ten times higher in people with diabetes.
  • Pregnant women with diabetes are at increased risk of maternal and foetal complications.
  • Diabetes can damage nerves and disrupt blood supply to the feet. In turn, this can lead to amputation - Somewhere in the world, a lower limb is lost to diabetes every 20 seconds.

  • Treating the consequences of unmanaged diabetes when already present places additional strain on national healthcare systems already struggling to cope with the demands of a growing population.

    Despite the staggering numbers, awareness of diabetes and its consequences in India remains low and many health professionals lack the required training and resources to identify individuals at high risk and prevent type 2 diabetes or diagnose diabetes early so that treatment can start in time to prevent complications or stop them from getting worse.

    The rise in type 2 diabetes can be stopped by focussing on education initiatives and establishing policies that support improved lifestyle and dietary choices. All types of diabetes can be managed effectively with regular and affordable access to medication and care.

    People with type 1 diabetes need insulin to stay alive. Nearly 100 years after insulin was first used successfully to treat diabetes, many people with diabetes, particularly those in low and middle-income countries struggle to access a reliable supply.

    In view of the challenges that diabetes poses in India, the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) has chosen Hyderabad to host the first IDF Diabetes Complications Congress on October 25-27 2018. The three-day event aims to increase awareness and knowledge of diabetes and its associated complications among health professionals, in order to promote the screening and early diagnosis that will improve health outcomes and help save lives.

    IDF 2018 will feature over 100 invited speakers from around the world and a dynamic programme, spread over seven streams. It will provide participants with the latest research on treatment and tools to address diabetes complications.



    Source: Medindia

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