About My Health Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Sudden Loss of T Cells Not the Trigger for AIDS: Study

by VR Sreeraman on September 23, 2007 at 11:09 AM
Font : A-A+

Sudden Loss of T Cells Not the Trigger for AIDS: Study

A new study has suggested that a sudden loss of T cells (white blood cells that provide continuing immunity to infection) is not the trigger for the progression of AIDS.

A team of researchers at Tulane National Primate Research Center conducted the research that was led by Ivona V. Pandrea and Cristian Apetrei. The study is published in the September 2007 issue of the Journal of Immunology.

Advertisement

The researchers based their suggestion on a study on monkeys by which they found that some non-human primates infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) do not develop AIDS after sudden, acute loss of T cells - considered to be sufficient to predict progression of last stages of AIDS i.e. the final collapse of the immune system and death.

SIV is a retrovirus that is found, in numerous strains, in primates; the specific strains infecting humans are HIV-1 and HIV-2, the viruses that cause AIDS.
Advertisement

The boffins state that African green monkeys infected with SIV, for example, were found to recover even after a period of severe T cell depletion.

Two companion papers in the Journal of Immunology by researchers from the University of Pennsylvania and Southwestern University of Dallas came to the same conclusions in their studies of sooty mangabeys.

The study raised another question that why monkeys with SIV, unlike HIV-positive humans, are generally resistant to progression to AIDS after infection with the virus.

The answer, the authors propose, is that thousands of years of host/virus co-adaptation has enabled monkeys, the natural hosts of SIV, to effectively limit T cell immune activation and apoptosis, a mechanism that leads to progression of the disease.

By contrast, humans, who were introduced to the virus relatively, recently, have not had the opportunity to develop such protective adaptations.

The researchers also suggested that approaches to control immune system activation and resultant cell death should be considered for use in addition to currently available therapies to slow progression of the disease in HIV-infected individuals.

Source: ANI
SRM/S
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
News Category
What's New on Medindia
Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD)
First Dose of COVID-19 Vaccines May Improve Mental Health
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
AIDS/HIV AIDS/HIV - Clinical Features Parkinsons Disease Surgical Treatment AIDS/HIV - Common Opportunistic Infections HIV Symptom AIDS and Pregnancy Safe Sex 

Recommended Reading
AIDS/HIV
"AIDS is an epidemic disease, a potentially preventable, deadly infection for which there is no ......
AIDS/HIV - Epidemiology
AIDS or HIV is an epidemic disease, a potentially deadly infection that can be prevented with ......
AIDS/HIV - Clinical Features
Encyclopedia section of medindia gives general info about HIV Clinical Features...
AIDS and Pregnancy
The Acquired immune deficiency syndrome is brought about by the deadly human immunodeficiency virus....
AIDS/HIV - Common Opportunistic Infections
Kaposi sarcoma develops below the skin surfaces or in mucous membranes of mouth, nose or anus and ap...
Safe Sex
Sex is fun but involves health risks such as sexually transmitted diseases (STDs or unplanned pregna...

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2021

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use