About Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Study Says Animals That Use One Side of Their Brains More Successful Than Two-Sided Ones

by Rajashri on September 8, 2009 at 8:35 PM
Font : A-A+

 Study Says Animals That Use One Side of Their Brains More Successful Than Two-Sided Ones

Animals that process information using a preferred hemisphere of the brain fare better those who use both sides of their brain simultaneously, a new study has said.

According to a report by ABC News, the study suggests the brain operates like a dual processor in a computer, with each of the brain's two sides kicking into action depending on the content or context of the information.

Advertisement

Dr Culum Brown of the Department of Biological Sciences at Macquarie University in Sydney, and colleague Maria Magat, focused their research on several different types of Australian birds, such as gang-gangs, sulfur-crested cockatoos and Australian king parrots.

All of the birds participated in two tests designed to test their cerebral lateralisation, meaning how strongly each bird preferentially processes information using either hemisphere of the brain.
Advertisement

The first task was a simple pebble-seed discrimination test, where the birds had to pick seeds out of a background of similar sized pebbles.

The second task was more demanding.

The researchers attached food to the end of a suspended string that the birds had to manipulate with their beaks and feet in order to get the tasty reward.

Birds with a preference for using either of their eyes or either of their legs did better than birds that used both eyes and both legs equally.

This means that the most successful birds have a very strong cerebral lateralisation, which "is influenced by both genes and experience," according to Brown.

He and Magat found that the pattern of lateralisation, left or right bias, did not predict success as much as the strength of the particular bias did.

Carrying the findings over to humans, this suggests, in part, that a right-handed person isn't more successful than a left-handed one, and vice-versa.

But people who always favour a certain hand, foot or eye for certain tasks will likely perform better than those who don't exhibit obvious preferences.

Brown said that there are several reasons why such specialized division of the brain confers benefits to the individual.

"Firstly, it means that a given hemisphere can become increasingly specialized at processing certain types of information," he said.

According to Brown, assigning particular tasks to each side of the brain avoids conflict between the two hemispheres, and allows "multiple sources of information to be processed simultaneously, that is to say, animals can multitask like a dual processor in a computer."

Source: ANI
RAS
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
What's New on Medindia
Top 10 Vitamin B12 Foods for Vegetarians - Slideshow
Targeted Screening Program Beneficial for Prostate Cancer Screening
Are Menopause Symptoms Troubling You?: Try these Options
View all
Recommended Reading
News Archive
Date
Category
Advertisement
News Category

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Ataxia Language Areas in The Brain Ways to Improve your Intelligence Quotient (IQ) 

Most Popular on Medindia

Blood Pressure Calculator Pregnancy Confirmation Calculator Selfie Addiction Calculator Drug Side Effects Calculator The Essence of Yoga Post-Nasal Drip Calculate Ideal Weight for Infants Blood Donation - Recipients Noscaphene (Noscapine) Hearing Loss Calculator

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2022

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use