About My Health Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Sleep Apnea Tied to Higher Levels of Alzheimer's Biomarker in Brain

by Adeline Dorcas on March 4, 2019 at 11:30 AM
Font : A-A+

Sleep Apnea Tied to Higher Levels of Alzheimer's Biomarker in Brain

People suffering from sleep apnea may have higher levels of an Alzheimer's disease biomarker in the brain, reports a new study.

People who are witnessed by a bed partner to have stopped breathing during sleep may have higher accumulations of an Alzheimer's disease biomarker called tau in an area of the brain that helps with memory, according to a preliminary study released that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 71st Annual Meeting in Philadelphia.

Advertisement


Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a condition that involves frequent events of stopped breathing during sleep, although an apnea may also be a single event of paused breathing during sleep.

Tau, a protein that forms into tangles, is found in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease.

"A person normally has fewer than five episodes of apnea per hour during sleep," said study author Diego Z. Carvalho, MD, of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., and a member of the American Academy of Neurology. "Bed partners are more likely to notice these episodes when people stop breathing several times per hour during sleep, raising concern for obstructive sleep apnea. Recent research has linked sleep apnea to an increased risk of dementia, so our study sought to investigate whether witnessed apneas during sleep may be linked to tau protein deposition in the brain."
Advertisement

The study involved 288 people age 65 and older who did not have cognitive impairment. Bed partners were asked whether they had witnessed episodes of stopped breathing during sleep.

Participants had positron emission tomography (PET) brain scans to look for accumulation of tau tangles in the entorhinal cortex area of the brain, an area of the brain in the temporal lobe that is more likely to accumulate tau than some other areas. This area of the brain helps manage memory, navigation, and perception of time.

A team of researchers identified 43 participants, 15 percent of the study group, whose bed partners witnessed apneas when they were sleeping.

The research team found those who had apneas had on average 4.5 percent higher levels of tau in the entorhinal cortex than those who did not have apneas, after controlling for several other factors that could affect levels of tau in the brain, such as age, sex, education, cardiovascular risk factors and other sleep complaints.

"Our research results raise the possibility that sleep apnea affects tau accumulation," said Carvalho. "But it's also possible that higher levels of tau in other regions may predispose a person to sleep apnea, so longer studies are now needed to solve this chicken and egg problem."

Limitations of the study included its relatively small sample size and preliminary nature of the study requiring future validation. Furthermore, a lack of sleep studies to confirm the presence and severity of sleep apnea and a lack of information regarding whether or not participants were already receiving treatment for sleep apnea is another serious limitation.

Source: Eurekalert
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
News Category
What's New on Medindia
First Dose of COVID-19 Vaccines May Improve Mental Health
Printed Temperature Sensors help with Continuous Temperature Monitoring
Health Benefits of Giloy
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Snoring Parkinsons Disease Sleep Disorder Sleep Disorder : Restless Legs Syndrome Sleep Disorder: Sleepwalking Parkinsons Disease Surgical Treatment Periodic Limb Movement Disorder REM Behavior Disorder Sleep Disturbances In Women Sleep 

Recommended Reading
Alzheimers Disease
Alzheimer's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disease affecting memory and thinking and ......
Obstructive Sleep Apnea
Obstructive sleep apnea should be suspected in overweight middle aged adults who snore loudly and ....
Genetics of Alzheimer´s disease
There are numerous genes that have been discovered that are associated with Alzheimer's disease and ...
Length of Breathing Disruption in Sleep Apnea May Help Predict Death Risk
The length of interrupted breathing in sleep apnea patients may be a better predictor of death ......
Parkinsons Disease
Parkinson’s disease is a neurodegenerative disease caused by progressive dopamine brain cells loss. ...
Periodic Limb Movement Disorder
Periodic limb movement disorder (PLMD) is a sleep disorder which causes repetitive cramping or jerki...
REM Behavior Disorder
REM Behavior Disorder (RBD) is a sleep disorder in which the person acts out dramatic or violent dre...
Sleep
Sleep is a behavioral state of restricted physical activity. It is controlled by our internal biolo...
Sleep Disorder
Sleep disorders can either be having difficulty in getting sleep or dozing off at inappropriate ......
Sleep Disorder : Restless Legs Syndrome
Restless legs syndrome (RLS) causes - An urge to move, usually due to uncomfortable sensations that...
Sleep Disorder: Sleepwalking
Sleepwalking or “Somnambulism,” is a type of parasomnia and has medico-legal implications...
Sleep Disturbances In Women
The physical, emotional and hormonal changes that occur in women during puberty, menstrual cycle, pr...
Snoring
Turbulent airflow causes tissues of the nose and throat to vibrate and the noise produced by these v...

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2021

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use