About Careers MedBlog Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Retweeting or Sharing on Social Media can Hinder Learning and Memory

by Shirley Johanna on April 30, 2016 at 12:35 PM
Font : A-A+

The simple act of retweeting or sharing information on the social media creates a "cognitive overload" that interferes with learning and memory, says a new research.

According to the team from Cornell University in the US, that "overload" can spill over and diminish performance in the real world.

Advertisement

Retweeting or Sharing on Social Media can Hinder Learning and Memory
Retweeting or Sharing on Social Media can Hinder Learning and Memory

"Most people don't post original ideas anymore. You just share what you read with your friends," said Qi Wang, professor of human development at Cornell.

"But they don't realize that sharing has a downside. It may interfere with other things we do," he warned.

Wang and colleagues in China conducted experiments showing that "retweeting" interfered with learning and memory, both online and off.
Advertisement

The experiments were conducted at Beijing University, with a group of Chinese college students as subjects.

At computers in a laboratory setting, two groups were presented with a series of messages from Weibo - the Chinese equivalent of Twitter.

After reading each message, members of one group had options either to repost or go on to the next message. The other group was given only the "next" option.

After finishing a series of messages, the students were given an online test on the content of those messages.

Those in the repost group offered almost twice as many wrong answers and often demonstrated poor comprehension.

What they did remember they often remembered poorly, Wang reported. "For things that they reposted, they remembered especially worse," she added.

The researchers found that reposters were suffering from "cognitive overload."

"When there is a choice to share or not share, the decision itself consumes cognitive resources," Wang explained.

After viewing a series of Weibo messages, the students were given an unrelated paper test on their comprehension of a "New Scientist" article.

Again, participants in the no-feedback group outperformed the reposters. The results confirmed a higher cognitive drain for the repost group.

"The sharing leads to cognitive overload, and that interferes with the subsequent task," Wang said.

"In real life when students are surfing online and exchanging information and right after that they go to take a test, they may perform worse," she suggested in a paper described in the journal Computers in Human Behavior.

The researchers suggest that web interfaces should be designed to promote rather than interfere with cognitive processing.

"Online design should be simple and task-relevant," Wang noted.



Source: IANS
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
What's New on Medindia
Test Your Knowledge on Sugar Intake and Oral Health
Test  Your Knowledge on Heart
Test Your Knowlege on Genes
View all
Recommended Reading
News Archive
Date
Category
News Category

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Brain Exercises to Improve Memory Foods to Improve Memory Power Ways to Improve your Intelligence Quotient (IQ) Relationship Problems and Top Ways to Solve Them Quick and Easy Ways to Memorize Things 7 Ways How Writing by Hand Improves Brain Power 

Most Popular on Medindia

How to Reduce School Bag Weight - Simple Tips Blood - Sugar Chart Noscaphene (Noscapine) Iron Intake Calculator Hearing Loss Calculator Sanatogen Accident and Trauma Care Color Blindness Calculator Drug - Food Interactions Vent Forte (Theophylline)
This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use
open close
ASK A DOCTOR ONLINE

×

Retweeting or Sharing on Social Media can Hinder Learning and Memory Personalised Printable Document (PDF)

Please complete this form and we'll send you a personalised information that is requested

You may use this for your own reference or forward it to your friends.

Please use the information prudently. If you are not a medical doctor please remember to consult your healthcare provider as this information is not a substitute for professional advice.

Name *

Email Address *

Country *

Areas of Interests