Hepatitis C Drugs can Decrease Liver-related Deaths by Nearly Half

by Iswarya on  August 10, 2019 at 3:25 PM Drug News
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Antiviral drugs for hepatitis C decrease liver-related deaths by nearly 50 percent in patients with a history of liver cancer, reveals a new study. The findings of the study are published in the journal Gastroenterology.
Hepatitis C Drugs can Decrease Liver-related Deaths by Nearly Half
Hepatitis C Drugs can Decrease Liver-related Deaths by Nearly Half

Dr. Amit Singal's study was published in the journal on July 30. Dr. Singal is an Associate Professor of Internal Medicine, Medical Director of the UT Southwestern Liver Tumor Program, and Clinical Chief of Hepatology. He collaborated on these studies with Dr. Caitlin Murphy, Assistant Professor of Population and Data Sciences and Internal Medicine. They are both members of the Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center at UT Southwestern.

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Their studies overturn prior misconceptions that made doctors reluctant to prescribe direct-acting antivirals to treat hepatitis C in patients with a history of liver cancer. Many doctors previously believed that hepatitis C, for all its harmfulness, activates the immune system when it infects the liver, and the immune system kept liver cancer recurrence at bay.

But this notion appears to be false. Drs. Singal and Murphy studied nearly 800 patients from 31 medical centers across the country and found that the drugs are not only safe, but they also decrease death from cirrhosis and liver cancer by 46%.

"Not only are these drugs safe in this patient population, but we have now demonstrated that they are helpful," Dr. Singal said. "Our study changes the paradigm from you could treat a patient's hepatitis C to you should treat it."

Dr. Carlos L. Arteaga, Director of the Simmons Cancer Center, said the study's scope and impact are something that can only be produced by a National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center. "Dr. Singal had more patients involved in the study than any other participating site. As an epidemiologist, Dr. Murphy brought rigor to the data that removes prior doubt on this issue," he said.

Dr. Murphy said previous studies compounded the misunderstandings of direct-acting antiviral therapy because they, among other things, failed to account for the timing of therapy relative to liver cancer diagnosis, did not include a comparison group, or did not properly consider clinical differences among patients.

The new study is a significant contribution because it clears the path to beneficial drug treatment.

"Hepatitis C therapy is so important because it provides a cure," Dr. Singal said. "You take oral medications for two or three months, with minimal to no side effects, and you're done. You're cured of hepatitis C. There's less than a 1% chance of relapse if you're cured of hepatitis C."

Defeating hepatitis C is an important step because the infection can otherwise lead to cirrhosis - scarring of the liver - which can be deadly. Cirrhosis can increase the risk of liver cancer, which also may be fatal. Curing hepatitis C with antivirals breaks the first link in a deadly chain of events and can lead to an improvement in liver function among those who have previously developed cirrhosis.

Hepatitis C rapidly made its way into the American bloodstream in the 1970s and 1980s when intravenous drug use spiked, and blood products were not screened for the hepatitis C virus. Hepatitis C infected 2 to 3% of the baby boomer population, the largest generation in U.S. history. Millions were affected.

The disease can lie dormant for 25 to 30 years and resurface as a life-threatening specter years after someone has stopped using drugs and turned to a healthy lifestyle. Hepatologists saw an alarming spike in cirrhosis as baby boomers aged. By 2017, The New York Times called hepatitis C, "an enormous public health problem." In 2018, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced there were nearly 2.4 million people living with hepatitis C in the U.S.

"Dr. Singal's and Dr. Murphy's study reports a welcome, fact-based way to oppose the adverse effects of hepatitis C infection in various demographic groups," Dr. Arteaga said. "Their findings will have a global, life-saving impact on how hepatitis C is treated. It is particularly important to Texas because the liver cancer incidence rate in Texas is the highest in the nation."

Dr. Arteaga said the study is also important because liver cancer is highest among the Hispanic population in Texas, and research-based advances in reducing cancer in underserved groups are a Simmons Cancer Center priority.

Source: Eurekalert

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I was HBV [hepatitis B virus] carrier by birth, I even took Sebivo for 3 years when the stage became acute. I stopped taking the medicine because of the rust of my skin. This year virus is back again at the highest state. So far now I just safeguard my liver by taking honey, and HP Pro. By having enough rest, doing light exercise and avoid alcohol to boost body immunity. April My parents purchased six bottles of HBV herbal formula from (BHHC) BEST HEALTH HERBAL CENTRE for the whole family. I used 2 bottles for 6 weeks just like my parents, now we are completely free from Hepatitis B virus. My family is now enjoying the benefit of healthy life.

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