About Careers Internship MedBlog Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Soy Foods, Cruciferous Veggies Reduce Treatment Side Effects of Breast Cancer
Advertisement

Soy Foods, Cruciferous Veggies Reduce Treatment Side Effects of Breast Cancer

Font : A-A+

Highlights
  • Higher intake of cruciferous vegetables and soy foods were associated with fewer reports of menopausal symptoms in breast cancer survivors.
  • Higher soy intake was also associated with less reported fatigue.
  • Phytochemicals or bioactive food components, such as isoflavones in soy foods and glucosinolates in cruciferous vegetables may be the source of the benefit.

Soy foods such as soy milk, tofu and edamame and cruciferous vegetables such as cabbages, kale, collard greens, bok choy, Brussels sprouts, and broccoli may be associated with a reduction in common side effects of breast cancer treatment.

In the study, published in Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, higher intake of cruciferous vegetables and soy foods were associated with fewer reports of menopausal symptoms. Higher soy intake was also associated with less reported fatigue.

Advertisement


Reducing the Side Effects of Breast Cancer treatment

The breast cancer survivors study included 173 non-Hispanic white and 192 Chinese Americans including US-born Chinese and Chinese immigrants.

Breast cancer survivors often experience side effects from cancer treatments that can persist months or years after completion of treatment. For example, because many treatments designed to prevent breast cancer recurrence inhibit the body's production or use of estrogen, the hormone that can fuel breast cancer growth, breast cancer patients often experience hot flashes and night sweats, among other side effects.
Advertisement

Women who included soy foods in their daily diet had
  • Fewer joint problems
  • Hair thinning/loss
  • Memory loss
  • Menstrual cramps
Sarah Oppeneer Nomura, Georgetown Lombardi, said that while further research is needed in larger study populations and with more detailed dietary data, this project addresses an important gap in research on the possible role of lifestyle factors, such as dietary habits, in relation to side effects of treatments.

"These symptoms can adversely impact survivors' quality of life and can lead them to stop ongoing treatments, she says. "Understanding the role of lifestyle factors is important because diet can serve as a modifiable target for possibly reducing symptoms among breast cancer survivors."

Intake of Soy Foods prior to Breast Cancer

Phytochemicals or bioactive food components, such as isoflavones in soy foods and glucosinolates in cruciferous vegetables may be the source of the benefit, researchers say. Isoflavones bind to estrogen receptors and exert weak estrogenic effects, among other effects.

Glucosinolates in cruciferous vegetables influence levels of metabolizing enzymes that can modulate inflammation and levels of estrogen, possibly attenuating treatment-related symptoms.

When study participants were evaluated separately by race/ethnicity, associations were significant among white breast cancer survivors; however; while a trend was seen in the benefit for Chinese women, results were not statically significant.

Chinese women typically report fewer menopausal symptoms. Most of them also consume cruciferous vegetables and soy foods, making it difficult to see a significant effect in this subgroup. Indeed, in this study, Chinese breast cancer survivors ate more than twice as much soy and cruciferous vegetables.

Whether the reduction in symptoms accounts for longtime use of soy and cruciferous vegetables needs further investigation, says the study's senior author, Judy Huei-yu Wang, PhD, of Georgetown Lombardi's Cancer Prevention and Control Program.

Results obtained in preclinical studies in animals show that biologically active compounds present in both soy and cruciferous vegetables cause breast cancer cells to grow, but have opposite effects in animals that consume these compounds well before cancer is diagnosed and continue consuming them during and after cancer treatments.

Until more research is conducted, breast cancer patients should not suddenly start eating soy, if they have not consumed it before, says Leena Hilakivi-Clarke, PhD, a professor of oncology at Georgetown Lombardi and a co-author of the study.

Reference
  1. Judy Huei-yu Wang, Chiranjeev Dash, Leena Hilakivi-Clarke, Yi-Tin Hwang, Scarlett Lin Gomez, Teresa T. Fung,  Shu-Lan Yeh, Serena Phillips. 'Soy, cruciferous vegetables associated with fewer common breast cancer treatment side effects.' Breast Cancer Research and Treatment (2107).


Source: Medindia

Citations   close

Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
What's New on Medindia
World Heart Day in 2022- Use Heart for Every Heart
Anemia among Indian Women and Children Remains a Cause of Concern- National Family Health Survey-5
H1N1 Influenza Prevention in Children: What Parents Need to Know
View all
Recommended Reading
News Archive
Date
Category
Advertisement
News Category

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Women and Cancer Breast Biopsy Pagets disease of the breast Mastitis Cancer and Homeopathy Why Do We Eat - Nutrition Facts Diet Lifestyle and Heart Disease Soy / Soya - A Holy Food Breast Cancer Facts Cancer Facts 

Most Popular on Medindia

Selfie Addiction Calculator Find a Hospital The Essence of Yoga Indian Medical Journals A-Z Drug Brands in India Calculate Ideal Weight for Infants Turmeric Powder - Health Benefits, Uses & Side Effects Drug - Food Interactions Vent Forte (Theophylline) Loram (2 mg) (Lorazepam)
This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use
×

Soy Foods, Cruciferous Veggies Reduce Treatment Side Effects of Breast Cancer Personalised Printable Document (PDF)

Please complete this form and we'll send you a personalised information that is requested

You may use this for your own reference or forward it to your friends.

Please use the information prudently. If you are not a medical doctor please remember to consult your healthcare provider as this information is not a substitute for professional advice.

Name *

Email Address *

Country *

Areas of Interests