About Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Microbial Activity in the Mouth May Help Identify Autism in Children
Advertisement

Microbial Activity in the Mouth May Help Identify Autism in Children

Font : A-A+

Highlights:
  • Bacterial activity in the mouth may help identify children with autism spectrum disorder(ASD)
  • Gene expression activity within oral microbial communities is altered in children with autism spectrum disorder
  • Autism is associated with several abnormalities related to the mouth and throat, which includes taste and texture aversions, speech difficulties and salivary transcriptome alterations

Bacteria living in the mouth can help identify children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), reports a new study. The findings of the study are published in the journal Autism Research.

New research suggests that shifts in the bacteria within a child's mouth could provide objective biomarkers for identifying autism spectrum disorder. The findings of this research, conducted by scientists from Penn State Medical Center, SUNY Upstate Medical University, and Quadrant Biosciences, Inc., catalyze the development of a novel, saliva-based panel to aid clinicians in the early diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder.

Advertisement


Previous research has suggested that bacteria living in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract may influence autistic behavior. Moreover, autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is associated with several abnormalities related to the mouth and throat, including taste and texture aversions, speech difficulties and salivary transcriptome alterations.

"There is mounting evidence that the GI microbiome is disrupted in children with ASD, and this study shows that this disruption may extend to the mouth and throat. It appears that gene expression activity within oral microbial communities is altered in children with autism spectrum disorder," said Steven Hicks, MD, Ph.D., of Penn State Hershey, lead investigator on the project.
Advertisement

"The shifts in microbial populations were associated with ASD co-morbidities such as GI disturbances, as well as social and repetitive behaviors. This research suggests that measuring the activity of these microbial populations in saliva may provide objective biomarkers to aid in the clinical evaluation of ASD."

In this study, researchers identified changes in the salivary microbiome of 346 children aged 2-6 years across three developmental profiles: ASD (n=180), non-autistic developmental delay (DD) (n=60), and typically developing children (TD) (n=106). Saliva was collected via a cheek swab from each study participant. RNA from actively transcribing microbes was sequenced, quantified and analyzed across the three groups of children. ASD children with and without GI disturbances were also compared.

The researchers found 12 groups of microbes to be altered between the development status groups and identified 28 groups that distinguished ASD patients with and without GI disturbances. Five ratios of microbes distinguished ASD from TD children (79.5% accuracy), three distinguished ASD from DD (76.5% accuracy), and three distinguished ASD children with/without GI disturbance (85.7% accuracy). Interestingly, the microbial gene expression patterns associated with autism were implicated in energy processing.

"The underlying association of specific microbial population shifts with ASD status will require further study, but may result from alterations of microbial metabolism, or through pathogenic microbial-host relationships," said Frank Middleton, Ph.D., study co-investigator from SUNY Upstate Medical University.

"We saw significant differences in gene expression in these organisms that were associated with lysine degradation, an important building block in neurotransmitter production."

Richard Uhlig, Founder and Chief Executive Officer of Quadrant Biosciences and one of the co-authors of the study, noted that Quadrant is developing a saliva-based biomarker panel to aid clinicians in the earlier diagnosis of ASD. "These research findings have been fundamental in our ongoing efforts to develop a biomarker panel that can provide clinicians and parents with more confidence in the diagnosis of ASD. Examining microbial activity will be a crucial element of the panel," he said.

"Our aim is to offer a molecular diagnostic that can provide objective support for the diagnosis of ASD as early as possible when treatment is most efficacious."

Source: Eurekalert

Citations   close

Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

  • APA

    Adeline Dorcas. (2018, August 18). Microbial Activity in the Mouth May Help Identify Autism in Children. Medindia. Retrieved on May 24, 2022 from https://www.medindia.net/news/healthwatch/microbial-activity-in-the-mouth-may-help-identify-autism-in-children-181852-1.htm.

  • MLA

    Adeline Dorcas. "Microbial Activity in the Mouth May Help Identify Autism in Children". Medindia. May 24, 2022. <https://www.medindia.net/news/healthwatch/microbial-activity-in-the-mouth-may-help-identify-autism-in-children-181852-1.htm>.

  • Chicago

    Adeline Dorcas. "Microbial Activity in the Mouth May Help Identify Autism in Children". Medindia. https://www.medindia.net/news/healthwatch/microbial-activity-in-the-mouth-may-help-identify-autism-in-children-181852-1.htm. (accessed May 24, 2022).

  • Harvard

    Adeline Dorcas. 2021. Microbial Activity in the Mouth May Help Identify Autism in Children. Medindia, viewed May 24, 2022, https://www.medindia.net/news/healthwatch/microbial-activity-in-the-mouth-may-help-identify-autism-in-children-181852-1.htm.

Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
What's New on Medindia
Can Weight Loss be Achieved by Drinking Water?
Can Exercise Counts Boost Your Life Counts? 
Prevent Hacking of Medical Devices: FDA Sounds Alarm
View all
Recommended Reading
News Archive
Date
Category
News Category

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Tongue Abnormalities Autism Height and Weight-Kids Rett Syndrome Acquired Epileptiform Aphasia Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD) 

Most Popular on Medindia

Pregnancy Confirmation Calculator Accident and Trauma Care Blood Pressure Calculator Color Blindness Calculator Blood Donation - Recipients Hearing Loss Calculator Post-Nasal Drip Blood - Sugar Chart Iron Intake Calculator How to Reduce School Bag Weight - Simple Tips

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2022

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use
open close
ASK A DOCTOR ONLINE