Gene Detects Low Blood-flow to Tissues and Helps Grow New Vessels

Gene Detects Low Blood-flow to Tissues and Helps Grow New Vessels

by Chrisy Ngilneii on  February 20, 2018 at 7:29 PM Health Watch
RSS Email Print This Page Comment bookmark
Font : A-A+

Highlights:
  • A newly discovered gene helps grow blood vessels when it senses inadequate blood flow to tissues.
  • This gene is called STEEL (spliced-transcript endothelial-enriched lncRNA).
  • The study may help improve our understanding of diseases associated with blood vessels.
A newly discovered gene helps grow blood vessels when it senses inadequate blood flow to tissues.
Gene Detects Low Blood-flow to Tissues and Helps Grow New Vessels

The research was led by Dr. Philip Marsden, a clinician scientist in the Keenan Research Centre for Biomedical Science of St. Michael's Hospital, and Dr. Jeffrey Man, a researcher in his lab.

Observing a group of newly described genes
Dr. Marsden and his team at the Keenan Research Centre for Biomedical Science of St. Michael's Hospital set out to better understand how blood vessels regulate the delivery of blood and nutrients to tissues and organs, and how to improve healing after injury caused by inadequate blood flow.

Dr. Marsden's lab studies endothelial cells, the cells that line the inside of blood vessels. For this study they looked at a newly described group of genes called long non-coding RNAs, or lncRNAs.

RNA, or ribonucleic acid, is found in all cells and it has traditionally been thought that its main job was to carry instructions from genes in DNA to make proteins. But lncRNAs have other roles, including determining the eventual function that individual cells will play in an organism. Studying lncRNAs gives researchers opportunities to find new markers and tests to help make diagnoses for patients.

Dr. Man said this study was the first to identify which lncRNAs are more enriched with endothelial cells compared to other cell types. They plan to make the list public for other researchers to use.

STEEL - the gene that helps grow new blood vessels
The team discovered that one of those lncRNAs, called STEEL (for spliced-transcript endothelial-enriched lncRNA) was the one that sensed inadequate blood flow in microscopic blood vessels.

"What is really interesting is that STEEL helps our body respond to inadequate blood flow by growing more blood vessels," Dr. Man said.

"These results show that our bodies are really finely tuned to perform, just as we need them to, and also demonstrate that disruptions to this fine balance can cause problems. This data can be used to improve our understanding of blood vessel diseases and help us find ways to improve healing and recovery after injury."

The findings are important because they could help scientists better understand cardiovascular diseases such as heart disease and strokes, which result from inadequate blood flow. The information could also lead to advances in efforts to grow replacement organs or to block blood vessels in tumors.

This study also made some findings that could be helpful for researchers studying lncRNAs in general, Dr. Marsden said. This study is one of the early studies to assess on a large scale which and how many proteins can associate with an individual lncRNA.

Reference:
    Study Looks At How Newly Discovered Gene Helps Grow Blood Vessels - (http://www.stmichaelshospital.com/media/detail.php?source=hospital_news/2018/0220a)

    Source: Eurekalert
    Advertisement

Post a Comment

Comments should be on the topic and should not be abusive. The editorial team reserves the right to review and moderate the comments posted on the site.
Notify me when reply is posted
I agree to the terms and conditions

More News on:

DNA Finger Printing Weaver Syndrome 

News A - Z

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

News Search

Medindia Newsletters

Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!

Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

Find a Doctor

Stay Connected

  • Available on the Android Market
  • Available on the App Store

News Category

News Archive

Loading...