Epinephrine Auto Injectors Still Work After Being Frozen

by Colleen Fleiss on  November 18, 2018 at 7:07 PM Drug News
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Freezing had no effect on how the epinephrine auto injectors (EAIs) functioned once they are thawed, found new study.
Epinephrine Auto Injectors Still Work After Being Frozen
Epinephrine Auto Injectors Still Work After Being Frozen

If you are one of the millions of people in the U.S. who has a severe allergy and carries an epinephrine auto injector (EAI) you may have wondered if it will still work if it gets left in your car in winter and freezes. Turns out it will still work, according to new research being presented at the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) Annual Scientific Meeting.

"Since many people who live in cold climates use an EAI, we wanted to explore the effects of freezing on how an EAI functions," says Julie Brown, MD, abstract author. "Lead author and researcher Alex Cooper took 104 same-lot pairs of EAIs and froze one of each pair for 24 hours, while the other was kept at recommended temperatures as a control.

Allergists recommend using epinephrine as the first line of defense in treating anaphylaxis. The consequences for not using epinephrine when it is needed are much more severe than using it when it might not be necessary.

"Many people who use EAIs have been concerned about the current shortage of EpiPens," says allergist Anne Ellis, MD, chair of the ACAAI Anaphylaxis Committee. "It's important for those who have severe, life threatening reactions to their allergies to have confidence in the EAIs they carry and know they'll work in an emergency."

If you have an EAI that was unintentionally frozen, and you experience an anaphylactic reaction, it's better to use a 'thawed' device than nothing at all. However, you should talk with your allergist about a prescription for a new device.

"The study did not examine the amount of epinephrine remaining in the solution after it had been frozen," says Dr. Ellis. "We know epinephrine is a somewhat unstable compound, and that's why the shelf life of EAIs is so short."

If you have a severe allergy that could result in anaphylaxis, see an allergist. Allergists are trained to help you live the life you want by working with you to treat allergic diseases and avoid severe reactions.

Source: Eurekalert

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