About My Health Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Agricultural Expansion Has Paved Way for Depletion of India's Mangroves

by Medindia Content Team on November 1, 2007 at 5:36 PM
Font : A-A+

Agricultural Expansion Has Paved Way for Depletion of India's Mangroves

A new research has found out the reality behind the destruction of tropical mangrove forests in the tsunami-affected regions of India, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand and Myanmar.

After analysing more than 750 Landsat satellite images, researchers came to the conclusion that the actual reason behind the depletion of mangrove forests is agricultural expansion, and not shrimp farming in the region.

Advertisement

The study involved quantifying the rates and causes of change from 1975 to 2005 and identifying the deforestation 'hot spots'.

The researchers found that the major factors responsible for mangrove deforestation in the study area included agriculture encroachment (81 percent), aquaculture (12 percent), and urban development (two percent).
Advertisement

Time-series analysis of historical data from the Landsat archive also suggested that the tsunami-impacted region lost 12 percent of the mangrove forests in the last three decades, much lower than the estimated mangrove loss in Asia, which ranged from 25 to 50 percent.

According to the researchers, mangrove loss varied from country to country and was also time specific.

The study found that the annual rate of deforestation was highest in Burma (- 1 percent) and lowest in Sri Lanka (0.1 percent) from 1975 to 2005.

In contrast, mangrove forests in India and Bangladesh remained unchanged or gained a small percentage during the period, the study revealed.

The researchers said the data and information generated from this study could be used to identify potential rehabilitation sites, set conservation priorities, and quantify the role of mangrove forests in saving lives and property from natural disasters such as the December 26, 2004 tsunami.

The study appears in the Journal of Biogeography.

Source: ANI
VEN/C
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Advertisement
News Category
What's New on Medindia
Memory Loss - Can it be Recovered?
International Day of Persons with Disabilities 2021 - Fighting for Rights in the Post-COVID Era
Effect of Blood Group Type on COVID-19 Risk and Severity
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.


Recommended Reading
Water Borne Diseases in Asia after Tsunami Attack
Encyclopedia section of medindia explains in brief about water borne diseases in Asia after Tsunami ...
Residents Up In Arms Against Mangrove Destruction
In their attempt to check the destruction of mangroves near their coastal homes, residents of ......

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2021

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use