About My Health Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Prognosis of Myelofibrosis can Now be Predicted by a Genetic Model

by Rishika Gupta on December 11, 2017 at 1:15 PM
Font : A-A+

Prognosis of Myelofibrosis can Now be Predicted by a Genetic Model

A new Genetic model has now been identified to predict primary myelofibrosis outcomes. This model has been specifically developed for patients who are 70 years old or younger and are still candidates for stem cell transplant. The findings of this study were discussed further at the 59th American Society of Hematology annual meeting in Atlanta.

"Myelofibrosis is a rare type of chronic leukemia that disrupts the body's normal production of blood cells," says Dr. Tefferi. "Prior to this study, the most comprehensive predictive model for outcomes in myelofibrosis, utilized mostly clinical variables, such as age, hemoglobin level, symptoms, white blood cell count and the percentage of immature cells in the peripheral blood."

Advertisement


Dr. Tefferi says he and his colleagues incorporated new genetic tests in the model for gene mutations including JAK2, CALR, and MPL, which are known to drive myelofibrosis. He says the new model also tests for the presence or absence of high-risk mutations such as ASXL1 and SRSF2.

"Our model is also unique in that we developed it for patients who are age 70 years or younger who may still be candidates for a stem cell transplant to treat their disease," Dr. Tefferi says.
Advertisement

Researchers studied 805 patients with primary myelofibrosis who were 70 years of age or younger. Patients were recruited from multiple centers in Italy and from Mayo Clinic in Minnesota. The Italian and Minnesota groups formed two independent learning and validation cohorts. "We were surprised by how similar the predictive models performed in two completely separate patient databases," Dr. Tefferi says.

Dr. Tefferi says that genetic information is increasingly being used as a prognostic biomarker in patients with primary myelofibrosis and he anticipates the potential use of such an approach along with relevant clinical, cytogenetic and mutational data for other hematologic and non-hematologic cancers.

Source: Eurekalert
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Advertisement
News Category
What's New on Medindia
Top 7 Benefits of Good Oral Hygiene
Healthy and Safer Thanksgiving 2021
Long-Term Glycemic Control - A Better Measure of COVID-19 Severity
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Genetics and Stem Cells Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) Christianson Syndrome Acute Coronary Syndrome 

Recommended Reading
Clinical Trials Show Targeted Drug Diminishes Suffering of Myelofibrosis Patients
The drug, pacritinib, can reduce the suffering caused by myelofibrosis. But scientists are unsure .....
Drug Induces Morphologic, Molecular Remissions in Myelofibrosis Patients
A Mayo Clinic study has found that Imetelstat, a novel telomerase inhibiting drug, has been found .....
Patients With Advanced Myelofibrosis Tolerate PRM-151 Therapy Well
The potential of the compound PRM-151 for reducing progressive bone marrow fibrosis (scarring) in .....
Mayo Clinic Research Suggests Drug Induces Clinical Remissions in Myelofibrosis
A Mayo Clinic study has found that imetelstat, a novel telomerase inhibiting drug, has been found .....
Acute Coronary Syndrome
Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is a sudden, acute life-threatening condition caused by a dramatic red...
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)
Find out more about the degenerative disease- Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis....
Christianson Syndrome
Christianson syndrome is a condition that occurs due to mutations (abnormal changes) in the gene SLC...

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2021

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use