About My Health Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

New Therapeutic Target for Glioblastoma and Other Cancers Discovered

by Colleen Fleiss on April 20, 2019 at 11:59 PM
Font : A-A+

New Therapeutic Target for Glioblastoma and Other Cancers Discovered

STAG2 - a gene commonly mutated in several human cancers that plays an essential role in DNA replication, revealing potential mechanisms for therapeutically targeting glioblastoma and other cancers has been discovered by UCSF researchers.

As part of a multi-protein complex called cohesin, the STAG2 protein has been implicated in numerous cellular functions. The cohesin complex, which forms a ring-like structure that encircles DNA molecules, was first identified for its role in regulating the separation of DNA chromatids during mitosis (the process of cell division).

Advertisement


Published today in Nature Communications,1 UCSF neuropathologist and cancer biologist David Solomon, MD, PhD and colleagues identify a new role for STAG2. "We found that STAG2 is required for replication fork progression, which can be exploited as a therapeutic vulnerability in STAG2-mutant cancers," said Solomon.

The replication fork is a structure that forms when DNA molecules are being replicated. Each strand of the DNA double helix is unwound and becomes a template for a new, matching partner strand, which is built and extended as the replication fork progresses.
Advertisement

The Solomon Lab reports that loss of STAG2, in normal cells, causes the replication fork to stall by disrupting interactions between the cohesin complex and DNA replication proteins. This leads to replication fork collapse and causes double-strand breaks in the DNA; consequent activation of DNA damage signaling pathways ultimately halts the cell cycle, thus preventing cell proliferation.

This leads to replication fork collapse and causes double-strand breaks in the DNA; consequent activation of DNA damage signaling pathways ultimately halts the cell cycle, thus preventing cell proliferation.

However, STAG2 inactivation behaves differently in tumor cells.

Source: Newswise
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
News Category
What's New on Medindia
Ways to Manage Stress during COVID-19 Pandemic
Can Adjusting Fatty Acid Intake Improve Mood in Bipolar Disorder Patients?
Insulin Resistance Doubles the Risk of Major Depressive Disorder
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Glioblastoma Multiforme Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors for Cancer Treatment Non-Communicable Diseases 

Recommended Reading
Glioblastoma Multiforme
Glioblastomas are tumors that arise from astrocytes that make up the supportive tissue of the ......
Glioblastoma Vaccine Shows Encouraging Results in Phase Ib Clinical Trial
New brain-cancer vaccine which was under investigation for more than 20 years suspends cancer ......
Quiz on Cancer
Cancer, is the second most leading cause of death worldwide. Cancer is not just one disease but ......
Lifetime Risk Calculator for Cancers
What are your chances for developing some common cancers in your lifetime - find out now....
Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors for Cancer Treatment
Immune checkpoint inhibitors are promising drugs to treat a variety of cancers and the FDA has appro...
Non-Communicable Diseases
Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs) are a group of chronic non-infectious diseases which include Cardio...

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2021

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use