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New Neurons in Adult Brains Are Responsible for Sensory Learning

by Shravanthi Vikram on February 24, 2018 at 7:25 PM
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New Neurons in Adult Brains Are Responsible for Sensory Learning

New neurons produced in the adult brain are responsible to carry sensory stimuli and its positive association with the sensory experience. It also speeds up the association between the stimuli and the action occurred due to the stimulus .The neurons generated after birth cannot perform this function. The findings of the study are published in the journal PNAS.

Although most neurons are generated during embryogenesis, some brain regions in mammals are capable of constantly regenerating their neurons in adulthood. The existence of these adult-born neurons has been proven, but many questions about their function and the way in which they integrate into their target areas remain unanswered.

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Research carried out by the Perception and Memory team (Institut Pasteur/CNRS), directed by Pierre-Marie Lledo, a CNRS Director of Research, has recently revealed the specific role of these neurons produced in the adult brain. This study demonstrates that assigning positive values to sensory experiences is closely based on the activity of adult-born neurons, and not the neurons formed shortly after birth. It is these new neurons that may enable individuals to anticipate the delivery of a reward.

The scientists focused on the production of new neurons in adult mice, in particular those neurons that integrate into the olfactory bulb, the brain region responsible for analyzing odors. These new neurons are thought to play a major role in providing flexibility for learning and memorizing olfactory sensory experiences.
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The scientists from the Institut Pasteur and the CNRS observed that the new neurons were able to react differently to an odor depending on the consequences associated with that sensory experience, such as whether or not there would be a reward. They also demonstrated that olfactory learning, in which the mice had to associate an odor with positive reinforcement, became easier once the new neurons had been activated. Finally, simply activating these adult-born neurons could be assimilated with a reward-predicting odor.

In short, this research shows that adult-born neurons are involved in the value associated with sensory stimuli rather than just the identification of the nature of a given sensory stimulus. It demonstrates that reward-motivated learning depends largely on adult neurogenesis.

Transferred to humans, these findings could improve our understanding of the role played by new neurons in the adult hippocampus in associative learning processes.



Source: Eurekalert
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