About My Health Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Gestures Important to Language Learning can be Used by Children With Brain Lesions

by Kathy Jones on February 22, 2013 at 9:16 PM
Font : A-A+

 Gestures Important to Language Learning can be Used by Children With Brain Lesions

A Georgia State University researcher has found that children with brain lesions suffered before or around the time of birth are able to use gestures to convey simple sentences. This is an important aspect of the language learning process.

Şeyda Ízšalışkan, assistant professor of psychology, and fellow researchers at the University of Chicago, looked at children who suffered lesions to one side of the brain to see whether they used gestures similar to typically developing children. She examined gestures such as pointing to a cookie while saying "eat" to convey the meaning "eat cookie," several months before expressing such sentences exclusively in speech.

Advertisement

"We do know that children with brain injuries show an amazing amount of plasticity (the ability to change) for language learning if they acquire lesions early in life," Ízšalışkan said. "However, we did not know whether this plasticity was characterized by the same developmental trajectory shown for typically developing children, with gesture leading the way into speech. We looked at the onset of different sentence constructions in children with early brain injuries, and wanted to find out if we could see precursors of different sentence types in gesture.

"For children with brain injuries, we found that this pattern holds, similar to typically developing children," she said. "Children with unilateral brain injuries produce different kinds of simple sentences several months later than typically developing children. More important, the delays we observe in producing different sentences in speech are preceded by a similar delay in producing the same sentences in gesture-speech combinations."
Advertisement

Children with brain injuries also had a more difficult time in producing complex sentences across gesture and speech, such as conveying relationships between actions, for example saying "help me do it" while making a painting gesture.

"This in turn was later reflected in a much narrower range of complex sentence types expressed in their speech," Ízšalışkan said. "This suggested to us, in general, that producing sentences across gesture and speech may serve as an embodied sensorimotor experience, that might help children take the next developmental step in producing these sentences in speech.

"And if you bypass the gesture-speech combination stage, that might negatively affect developing a broader representation of complex sentence types in speech."

The researchers also compared children with smaller brain lesions against children with large lesions, and found more of a delay in producing sentences, both in speech and in gesture-speech combinations, in children with large lesions.

The research has implications for developing interventions to help children with the language learning process, "as it shows that gestures are integral to the process of language learning even when that learning is taking place in an injured brain," Ízšalışkan said.

"When children do different kinds of sentence combinations across gesture and speech, that's like a signal to the caregiver that 'I'm ready for this,'" she said. "The caregiver can then provide relevant input to the child, and that could in turn help the child take the next developmental step in producing that sentence entirely in speech."

Source: Eurekalert
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Advertisement
News Category
What's New on Medindia
Cervical Cancer Awareness Month 2022
Ultra-Low-Fat Diet
Goji Berries May Protect Against Age-Related Vision Loss
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Parkinsons Disease Parkinsons Disease Surgical Treatment Height and Weight-Kids Brain Stuttering Brain Facts Ataxia Language Areas in The Brain Ways to Improve your Intelligence Quotient (IQ) Why Do We Wink? 

Recommended Reading
Childhood Obesity
Childhood obesity is one of the most serious health challenges in the developing countries and ......
Types of Food Allergies
If you are allergic to certain food items-Watch out for what you eat...
Kidney Stones in Children
Increase in salt concentration in the urine results in precipitation of crystals and these lead to ....
Ataxia
Ataxia affects coordination. Gait becomes unstable and the patient loses balance. The cerebellum or ...
Language Areas in The Brain
The mechanism of how human brain processes the language to express and comprehend the verbal, writte...
Parkinsons Disease
Parkinsonĺs disease is a neurodegenerative disease caused by progressive dopamine brain cells loss. ...
Stuttering
Stuttering, stammering or disfluency is a speech disorder that can hamper communication and affect a...
Ways to Improve your Intelligence Quotient (IQ)
Intelligence quotient (IQ) is a psychological measure of human intelligence. Regular physical and me...
Why Do We Wink?
Winking is a non-verbal form of communication that involves the rapid closing and opening of one eye...

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2022

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use
open close
CONSULT A DOCTOR
I have read and I do accept terms of use - Telemedicine

Advantage Medindia: FREE subscription for 'Personalised Health & Wellness website with consultation' (Value Rs.300/-)