Family Acceptance of LGBT Individuals Linked to Decreased Stress

by Iswarya on  October 24, 2018 at 4:36 PM Research News
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New study finds that LGBT individuals who can comfortably talk about their sexual identity with family members experience reduced stress. The findings of the study are published in the journal Psychosomatic Medicine.
Family Acceptance of LGBT Individuals Linked to Decreased Stress
Family Acceptance of LGBT Individuals Linked to Decreased Stress

The recent study by Zoccola and coauthor Andrew Manigault, M.S., discusses how feeling able to comfortably talk about your sexual identity with family members specifically, appears to be most linked to output of the stress hormone cortisol, a hormone that if too much is produced, it can damage an individual's health.

"The real stress punch seems to be with the family," said Zoccola when referencing how greater disclosure of an LGBT individual's sexuality to their family is strongly linked to lower cortisol.

She points out that there has been sparse research on how the aspects of coming out by LGBT adults affect the release of stress hormones, however, some early studies have shown that if people who identify as sexual minorities feel acceptance from their families, they have higher self-esteem, lower depression and substance use rates and are less likely to think about suicide.

For the study, Zoccola had 121 sexual minority adults ages 18 to 35 take a survey about their depression and anxiety levels, sociodemographic factors and how much support they felt. They were also asked how out they were to family, friends, acquaintances, coworkers, and clergy in religious organizations, as well as provided their age when they came out. Following the survey, 58 individuals from the group were randomly selected to provide a saliva sample to show their cortisol levels.

The results of Zoccola's research showed that the more open people were to disclosing their sexuality with their family, the lower cortisol levels they had.

"For these emerging adults, the family provides a foundation of support," said Zoccola. "If they're comfortable disclosing to their family, they seem to have a protective stress profile."

Source: Eurekalert

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