About My Health Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Experimental Alzheimer's Drug Slows Disease Progress in Early Study

by Bidita Debnath on March 21, 2015 at 11:21 PM
Font : A-A+

Experimental Alzheimer's Drug Slows Disease Progress in Early Study

In an early study, a new experimental drug for Alzheimer's disease has already exceeded high expectations.

The results of the trial of an antibody known as aducanumab, have shown some benefit in people who were given it in the very earliest stage of the disease, the Guardian reported. In the trial, conducted primarily to ensure the drug was safe and had no serious side-effects, brain scans showed a reduction of amyloid plaque, whose accumulation is thought to be one of the major causes of Alzheimer's.

Advertisement

The higher the dose of drug the patient was given, the greater the reduction and tests also showed that those people who took the drug had a slower rate of mental decline than those who did not.

Eric Karran, director of research at Alzheimer's Research UK, said that these are very promising early results, which not only demonstrate the safety of this treatment, but also suggest it may hold benefits in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease.
Advertisement

Karran added that while many previous anti-amyloid therapies have failed to meet their goals, these preliminary findings back up research suggesting that treatments targeting amyloid will need to be given early in the disease.

Karran noted that further data from this trial is yet to be reported, and it will be important to see this data as well as results from much larger trials before we can understand how effective this treatment may be.

Alfred Sandrock, group senior vice-president and chief medical officer at Biogen Idec, the company that made the drug, announced it would be moving quickly into large-scale trials which will involve hundreds, if not thousands, of people.

The trial results were presented at the International Conference on Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Diseases and Related Neurological Disorders in Nice, France.

Source: ANI
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
News Category
What's New on Medindia
Can Adjusting Fatty Acid Intake Improve Mood in Bipolar Disorder Patients?
Insulin Resistance Doubles the Risk of Major Depressive Disorder
Emotional Healing
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Alzheimers Disease Drug Toxicity Signature Drug Toxicity Genetics of Alzheimer´s disease 

Recommended Reading
Risk Factors for Alzheimers Disease
Cognitively normal adults exhibiting atrophy of their temporal lobe or damage to blood vessels in .....
Inability to Recognize Familiar Smells Could Signal Alzheimers
People who have difficulty recognizing familiar smells could be experiencing an early sign of ......
Lack of Vitamin D Linked to Higher Risk of Dementia
Older people who do not get enough vitamin D face a much higher risk of Alzheimer's disease or ......
Young Blood to Cure Decline of Aging Brain
A research showed that injections of juvenile mouse blood boosts learning and memory in older ......
Alzheimers Disease
Alzheimer's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disease affecting memory and thinking and mak...
Drug Toxicity
Drug toxicity is an adverse reaction of the body towards a drug that results as a side effect of a d...
Genetics of Alzheimer´s disease
There are numerous genes that have been discovered that are associated with Alzheimer’s disease and ...

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2021

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use