About My Health Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Viability of Donated Livers: Fresh Insights

by Colleen Fleiss on May 15, 2019 at 3:40 AM
Font : A-A+

Viability of Donated Livers: Fresh Insights

New study on the viability of donated livers and its correlation with donor demographics has been conducted by a group of researchers from Harvard Medical School and published in a forthcoming issue of TECHNOLOGY. The results of this study could lead to a reduction in the number of livers that are discarded and have repercussions for development of novel therapeutics and bioengineering for clinical research applications.

Advertisement


In order to lessen the burden on orthotopic liver transplantation, which is currently the only treatment for end stage liver disease, many researchers and scientists are exploring different avenues and developing techniques to address the shortage of livers for transplant. Techniques such as recellularized bioengineered livers and hepatic cell transplantation are exciting but still remain limited on a clinical level. In addition, new pharmaceutical therapies rely on primary hepatocytes to determine the toxicity, metabolism, and drug-drug interactions necessary for US Food and Drug Administration approval. A large source of human hepatocytes is thereby beneficial for continuing this research as well as potentially developing new lines of therapy both clinically and pharmaceutically. The question remains, where do large sources of primary hepatocytes come from?

A group of scientists at the Center for Engineering of Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts explored the donor demographics and procurement data of 16 livers to determine if these factors impact the yield and viability of primary hepatocytes. The project, led by Sharon Geerts, looked at 6 different donor demographics and 4 different procurement factors. The donor demographics consisted of age, body mass index (BMI), race, cause of death, whether the donor was considered death by cardiac death or death by brain death, and gender. The procurement factors that were considered were warm ischemia time (WIT), oxygen saturation, mean arterial pressure, and cold ischemia time (CIT).
Advertisement

Donor demographics such as race and gender had significant impacts on viability and yield while demographics such as BMI, age, donor status, cause of death did not. In addition, liver procurement data such as WIT showed that organs with less than 30 mins WIT led to significantly reduced yield, but no impact was found on viability. Cold ischemia time had no impact on yield, but longer CIT did decrease the viability of hepatocytes.

Though the number of livers was small (n=16) and should be taken into consideration, the conclusions drawn could be used as indications to expand liver selection criteria for hepatocyte isolations for many researchers and incorporate livers from donors that would have otherwise been discarded.

Source: Eurekalert
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
News Category
What's New on Medindia
Ways to Manage Stress during COVID-19 Pandemic
Can Adjusting Fatty Acid Intake Improve Mood in Bipolar Disorder Patients?
Insulin Resistance Doubles the Risk of Major Depressive Disorder
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.


Recommended Reading
Transplantation
Organ and tissue transplantation can give a second chance at life to thousands of people. Learn ......
Kidney Transplantation
Since the early times, the novel idea of transplanting tissues and other body parts from one ......
Quiz on Organ Donation and Transplantation
See how much you know about organ donation and transplantation by taking this ......
Opt-Out System for Organ Donation – England at a Crossroad
Should England follow the opt-out system? Would it increase the number of deceased donors or will .....

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2021

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use