About My Health Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Tool to Predict Kidney Failure or Death After Injury Being Developed By BWH Researchers

by Rukmani Krishna on September 5, 2013 at 1:13 AM
Font : A-A+

Tool to Predict Kidney Failure or Death After Injury Being Developed By BWH Researchers

A risk score calculation that can help predict which patients with rhabdomyolysis (a condition that occurs due to muscle damage) may be at risk for the severe complication of kidney failure or death was developed by researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH). This research will publish online September 2, 2013 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Rhabdomyolysis occurs when muscles are crushed and rupture, leaking toxic compounds into the circulation and can be caused by any condition that damages skeletal muscle and causes injury. Risk factors include crush injuries, alcoholism, heat stroke or severe exertion including strenuous exercise and as a rare side effect of taking cholesterol lowering medications called statins. One of the compounds called myoglobin can get caught in the kidneys and cause kidney failure and even death in severe cases.

Advertisement

"Currently doctors cannot easily predict which patients are most likely to have severe kidney failure or die from rhabdomyolysis," explained Gearoid McMahon, MB, BCh, a clinical fellow in BWH's Department of Medicine and lead author on this study. "Using routinely available clinical variables, we have developed a new risk prediction score that doctors can use to help predict a patient's expected outcome and plan for treatment accordingly."

The researchers conducted a retrospective cohort study of 2,371 patients admitted between 2000 and 2011 and analyzed variables that are thought to be associated with poor outcomes in this patient population, such as age, gender, and CPK levels. Using data from this analysis, researchers created a risk prediction score based on the variables that were most significantly associated with poor outcomes. The final variables that were included in the created model were age, gender, levels of initial phosphate, calcium, creatinine and CO2, CPK, and cause of rhabdomyolysis.
Advertisement

"This model may be particularly useful to evaluate and triage patients in the Emergency Department (ED)," said Sushrut Waikar, MD, MPH, director of Renal and Ambulatory Services at BWH and senior author of the study. "By current practice standards, patients with rhabdomyolysis are treated similarly regardless of the underlying cause and overall risk profile. Knowledge of the predicted risk of adverse outcomes may lead clinicians to choose different treatment options such as intravenous fluid administration in the ED followed by discharge with plans for repeat outpatient labs, rather than inpatient hospitalization for observation."

The researchers note that the next step will be to validate this risk score in other populations and to test its ability to guide treatment decisions. An online version of the Brigham rhabdomyolysis risk score is available at: http://www.brighamandwomens.org/research/rhabdo/default.aspx.

This research is consistent with the recent trend in medicine toward patient-centered outcomes research (PCOR), which focuses on identifying the risk of each patient and tailoring the treatment to improve their individual outcomes. BWH recently established the Patient-centered Comparative Effectiveness Research Center (PCERC) for researchers, like McMahon, that are dedicated to improving the health outcomes of BWH patients.

Source: Eurekalert
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
News Category
What's New on Medindia
Contraceptive Pills in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) Curtail Type 2 Diabetes Risk
Mushroom May Help Cut Down the Odds of Developing Depression
How to Battle Boredom during COVID
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Acute Renal Failure Athletes Foot Glomerulonephritis Amoebic Dysentery Urinary Stones In Children Vesico-Ureteric Reflux Causing UTI in Children Hydronephrosis / Antenatal Counseling Kidney Disease Death Facts Kidney 

Recommended Reading
Kidney Transplant can Prolong Survival in Obese Kidney Failure Patients
Kidney transplant could prolong the lives of obese individuals with kidney failure though this ......
Acute Renal Failure
Acute renal failure is the sudden cessation of the functioning of kidneys, that can be due to reduce...
Amoebic Dysentery
Amoebic dysentery or amoebiasis is an infection of the intestine that causes diarrhoea most frequent...
Athletes Foot
Athlete’s foot (tinea pedis/ringworm of the foot) is a fungal infection of the feet....
Glomerulonephritis
Glomerulonephritis is used to describe several kidney disease that damage the glomeruli. Glomerulone...
Hydronephrosis / Antenatal Counseling
Currently most pregnant women undergo one or two ultrasound scans during their pregnancy....
Urinary Stones In Children
There is a wide misconception that only adults develop stones. On the contrary kidney stones are ver...
Vesico-Ureteric Reflux Causing UTI in Children
Bacterial infection of urinary bladder can cause pain and burning sensation while passing urine. Abn...

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2021

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use