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Scientists Attempt To Decode How Long-Lasting Memories Are Registered In the Brain

by Tanya Thomas on August 16, 2009 at 11:50 AM
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 Scientists Attempt To Decode How Long-Lasting Memories Are Registered In the Brain

What cements those fleeting moments as 'life-long memories'? A team of research scientists led by Indian-origin boffin, hopes to provide the answer.

According to the researchers, the findings may one day help scientists develop treatments to prevent and treat conditions such as post-traumatic stress disorder.

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"Although many things are known about memories that form from repeat experiences, not much is known with regard to how some memories form with just one exposure," said Ashok Hegde, from Wake Forest University School of Medicine and the lead investigator on the study.

Hegde said that scientists do know that people tend to remember extremely happy or sad occasions vividly because of the emotional connection.

Extreme emotions trigger the release of a chemical in the brain called norepinephrine, which is related to adrenaline. That norepinephrine somehow helps memories last a long time - some even a lifetime.
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In the current study, Hegde and colleagues looked at how norepinephrine helps female mice remember the scent of their male partners after being exposed to it just once during mating.

The researchers studied the neural circuitry in the accessory olfactory bulb, the part of the brain where memory of the male partner's scent is stored.

They found that norepinephrine, released in mice while mating, activates an enzyme called Protein Kinase C (PKC), specifically, the "alpha" isoform of PKC, in the accessory olfactory bulb.

The PKC enzyme has about a dozen forms, or isoforms, that exist in the brains of mammals, including humans.

"The fact that PKC-alpha is activated through the release of norepinephrine is an important discovery. It explains how strong memories form for specific sensory experiences," Hegde said.

In female mice, the information about the partner's scent is carried by a chemical called glutamate and the fact that mating has occurred is conveyed by the release of norepinephrine, Hegde explained.

Previous studies have found that glutamate and norepinephrine together, but not individually, cause strong memory formation for the male's scent.

"No one knew how this happened. Our findings indicate that the PKC-alpha enzyme tells the nerve cells in the brain that these two chemicals have arrived together. PKC-alpha is like the bouncer who lifts the rope blocking the entrance to an exclusive club for strong memories when glutamate and norepinephrine arrive together. If they arrive alone, they can't get past the velvet rope," Hegde said.

Hegde said that when memory is stored in the brain, the connections between nerve cells, called synapses, change. Strong memories are formed when synapses become stronger through structural changes that occur at the synapse. PKC-alpha works with glutamate and norepinephrine to create those changes.

The study is available online and is scheduled to appear in an upcoming issue of Neuroscience.

Source: ANI
TAN
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