About Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Risk of Heart Disease Increases With Obstructive Sleep Apnea

by Rathi Manohar on July 14, 2010 at 6:07 PM
Font : A-A+

Risk of Heart Disease Increases With Obstructive Sleep Apnea

The risk of heart disease increases in later life with obstructive sleep apnea, states a new study.

In the study, researchers found that OSA raised the risk of heart failure for middle-aged and older men - and significantly raised the risk of coronary heart disease in men up to age 70.

Advertisement

In OSA, the airway collapses during sleep, leaving patients struggling to breathe.

OSA can predict a risk of heart diseases in men up to 70 years of age. Although, researchers have not found any relation of the OSA with women, but have said that the further study on women is warranted.
Advertisement

In the study researchers defined OSA as an hourly average of 30 or more breathing interruptions causing oxygen depletion and lasting at least 10 seconds.

This can cause blood oxygen to drop and can rouse people from sleep with a burst of adrenaline that increases blood pressure, which may contribute to vascular problems.

After adjusting for known heart risk factors, researchers found that men with the most severe OSA faced a 58 percent higher risk of developing heart failure than those without OSA. And those men aging 40 to 70 with the most severe OSA had a 68 percent higher risk of developing coronary heart disease than those without OSA.

"The Sleep Heart Health Study is the first to demonstrate prospectively that sleep apnea is associated with an increased incidence of heart failure," Daniel J. Gottlieb, lead study author and associate professor at Boston University's School of Medicine said.

The 1,927 men and 2,495 women were 40 or older and free of heart problems when the study began. Twenty-four percent of the men and 11 percent of the women had at least moderately severe OSA. Researchers assessed participants' health for a median follow-up of 8.7 years.

The most common treatment, called continuous positive airway pressure, involves the use of a machine that forces air into the airways to prevent breathing interruptions.

The study was published in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

Source: ANI
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
What's New on Medindia
Prevent Hacking of Medical Devices: FDA Sounds Alarm
Black Water: Benefits and Uses
World Hypertension Day 2022 - Measure Blood Pressure Accurately, Control It, Live Longer!
View all
Recommended Reading
News Archive
Date
Category
Advertisement
News Category

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Parasomnias - Part II Snoring Sleep Disorder Sleep Disorder : Restless Legs Syndrome Sleep Disorder: Sleepwalking Periodic Limb Movement Disorder REM Behavior Disorder Sleep Disturbances In Women Cardiac Catheterization Sleep 

Most Popular on Medindia

Sinopril (2mg) (Lacidipine) A-Z Drug Brands in India Diaphragmatic Hernia Drug Side Effects Calculator Loram (2 mg) (Lorazepam) Iron Intake Calculator Selfie Addiction Calculator Post-Nasal Drip Blood Pressure Calculator Daily Calorie Requirements

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2022

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use