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Poisoned Endangered Species of Vulture Saved from Death

by Julia Samuel on February 19, 2015 at 2:56 PM

Poisoned Endangered Species of Vulture Saved from Death
A dedicated team of the Centre for Wildlife Rehabilitation and Conservation (CWRC) run by the IFAW-WTI saved a Himalayan Griffon vulture, which was poisoned about a month ago along with 50 other endangered vultures.

The vulture was released along with yet another rehabilitated vulture from CWRC at Bam Rajabari village in Sivasagar district, at an awareness programme in the presence of stakeholders from the village where it was found.
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The solitary bird was rescued from the brink of death by the Mobile Veterinary Service (MVS) unit of the CWRC in a village in Sivasagar district and was rushed to Bam-Rajabari village.

Dr Biswajit Boruah, CWRC MVS veterinarian said, "We were shocked to find 19 white-backed vultures, three slender-billed vultures and 29 Himalayan griffons dead on the site. It was an acute poisoning case. Post-mortem samples and two whole carcasses were sent to the Regional Animal Health Centre, Khanapara for further toxicological investigation and confirmatory diagnosis."
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Dr Pradip Baishya, a local government veterinarian helped the Assam Forest Department and the CWRC to save the vulture. The CWRC team decided to release the bird back to its native site after it recovered in three weeks.

A public awareness meeting was organised prior to the release of the vulture with the Assam Forest Department, IFAW-WTI team from the CWRC, Bam Rajabari Village Committee, Village Defence Party and the villagers.

Suchan Chandra Gogoi, ACF, Sivasagar said, "We are very happy that at least one vulture is saved and is being sent back to its home range. It is the people of Bam Rajabari who should be appreciated for their effort to conserve the vulture nests in this area. The villagers feel that vultures are their friends and need to be protected. This kind of poisoning incident should be stopped for the greater interest of this endangered species."

Source: Medindia
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