About Careers Internship MedBlog Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

New Coating may Reduce Blood Clot Risk Inside Stents

by Dr. Enozia Vakil on September 6, 2013 at 5:30 PM
 New Coating may Reduce Blood Clot Risk Inside Stents

Artery-opening stents, if coated with a new compound, could help eliminate the side effects of the treatment, a new study reveals.

Stents are tiny mesh tubes that prop open clogged arteries so blood will flow freely to heart muscle, relieving chest pain and reducing the risk of heart attack. But implanting a stent damages the inner lining of the artery, triggering overgrowth of smooth muscle in the middle layer of the artery, a process that can re-narrow the passageway as the vessel wall thickens. To prevent this, stents are frequently coated with one of several medications that block smooth muscle growth.

Advertisement

However, the drugs that inhibit re-narrowing don't prevent another possible problem blood clots forming inside the vessel with the stent and make the side effect more likely. This happens because the medications also interfere with the repair and regrowth of a smooth and healthy layer of blood vessel lining cells (called endothelium) in the area of the stent.

In animal experiments of blood vessel injury, researchers found that a compound called a CTP synthase inhibitor successfully blocked smooth muscle growth and either promoted or didn't interfere with the growth of endothelial cells.
Advertisement

"We hope it may someday provide a long-term fix by supporting repair of the injured endothelium," said Shi-You Chen, Ph.D., senior author of the study and associate professor of physiology in the Department of Physiology and Pharmacology at the University of Georgia College of Veterinary Medicine in Athens. "Most currently available drug-eluting stents also stop the growth of the inner layer of endothelial cells. This delays repair of the stent-injured lining and can trigger inflammation and formation of a blood clot at the injury site, which may severely block coronary blood circulation and damage the heart."

Patients with stents are at the greatest risk for blood clots within the first 30 days after the initial procedure, but the potential for blood clots remains a year or more after stent insertion.

Source: Eurekalert
Font : A-A+

Advertisement

Advertisement
Advertisement

Recommended Readings

Latest Heart Disease News

Does Climbing Five Stair Flights Daily Cut Heart Disease Risk?
Daily stair climbing particularly lowered the risk of cardiovascular disease in individuals with lower susceptibility.
Link Between Cannabis Use Disorder and Heart Problem Risk
The research adds to the ongoing discussion concerning the health consequences of cannabis use disorder and its possible associations with heart disease
Why Heart Attacks Surge Among School-Aged Children?
Dietary choices and a sedentary lifestyle are major factors in the rise of heart attacks among school-aged children.
1,250 New Heart Attacks in People Under 35 Reported in Bangalore in 2 Years
In the past two years, the Bangalore PCAD registry reported over 2,500 heart attack cases in individuals under 40, with 1,250 of them under 35.
Gender Disparity in Heart Health: Women at 25% Greater Risk of Heart Diseases
World Heart Day 2023: Many women face difficulties when it comes to accessing healthcare services, including cardiovascular screening, preventive care, and treatment.
View All
This site uses cookies to deliver our services.By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use  Ok, Got it. Close
MediBotMediBot
Greetings! How can I assist you?MediBot
×

New Coating may Reduce Blood Clot Risk Inside Stents Personalised Printable Document (PDF)

Please complete this form and we'll send you a personalised information that is requested

You may use this for your own reference or forward it to your friends.

Please use the information prudently. If you are not a medical doctor please remember to consult your healthcare provider as this information is not a substitute for professional advice.

Name *

Email Address *

Country *

Areas of Interests