About My Health Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Mobile Phone Use By Australian Drivers Still High

by Medindia Content Team on October 14, 2007 at 11:04 AM
Font : A-A+

Mobile Phone Use By Australian Drivers Still High

There has been no decrease in the rate of handheld mobile phone use by Melbourne drivers in recent years despite penalties and legislation, according to a study published in the latest Medical Journal of Australia.

There is a fourfold increased risk of having a crash when using a mobile phone when driving, but researchers observed no decrease in the number of drivers using mobiles between 2002 and 2006.

Advertisement

Professor David Taylor, Director of Emergency Medicine Research at Austin Health in Melbourne, and his co-authors, say the apparently unchanged rates of handheld mobile use among drivers may be the result of higher numbers of people owning mobile phones.

"Over eight million mobile phone handsets were sold in Australia in 2005, more than double the figure in 2002," Prof Taylor says.

Because of this, he says, it is possible that public awareness campaigns have had a greater impact than the figures in their study suggest.
Advertisement

However, Prof David says mobile phone use is still a preventable risk, and policing and further public awareness campaigns are needed to get people to not use their mobiles while driving.

"We recommend research into prevention and deterrence, and into reasons for continuing handheld mobile use while driving."

In a related editorial in the Journal, Dr Suzanne McEvoy, Senior Research Fellow at The George Institute for International Health in Sydney, says mobiles are just one of a number of devices that may distract a driver.

Other potential distractions include driving-related technologies that seek to enhance mobility or safety, or non-driving related technologies such as iPods or wireless email.

Safety issues include: poor understanding of system operation; drivers taking more risks because they rely on additional safety equipment; system misuse; and increased driver workload.

Driving-related technologies that benefit road safety need regulatory requirements to ensure new vehicles are fitted with the technology.

"Drivers must be educated in the correct use of the technology," Dr McEvoy says.

"Any technologies found to be unsafe will require measures to limit their use by people while driving."

The Medical Journal of Australia is a publication of the Australian Medical Association.

Source: MJA
SRM/B
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
News Category
What's New on Medindia
Printed Temperature Sensors help with Continuous Temperature Monitoring
Health Benefits of Giloy
Breast Cancer Awareness Month 2021 - It's time to RISE
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Top Ten Cell Phone Safety Facts Five Places You Shouldn´t Store Your Cell Phone 

Recommended Reading
Longer the Use of Mobile Phones Greater the Cancer Risk
Using the mobile phone for a long time may increase risk of cancer, scientists in Britain have ......
Mobile Phone Masts Trigger Panic in Bristol, England
Mobile phone masts are creating panic in a housing complex in Bristol, England. One service ......
Five Places You Shouldn´t Store Your Cell Phone
Increased use of mobile phones has caused growing concern about the link between cell phones and can...

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2021

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use