About My Health Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Junk Food Intake in Kids Reduced by Health Education That Addresses Emotional Issues

by Iswarya on August 24, 2019 at 11:19 AM
Font : A-A+

Junk Food Intake in Kids Reduced by Health Education That Addresses Emotional Issues

Teacher training followed by classroom education with activities, information, and emotional support improves lifestyle in teachers and students, reports a new study. The findings of the study are presented at ESC Congress 2019 together with the World Congress of Cardiology.

The study suggests that knowledge alone is insufficient to change behavior.

Advertisement


"Numerous studies have addressed health issues in the school setting, but most have focused on physical activity and nutrition, with little attention to emotional issues such as self-esteem, depression and eating behaviors," said study author Dr Carolinne Santin Dal Ri, a paediatrician at the Institute of Cardiology of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil.

The Happy Life, Healthy Heart program randomly allocated ten public schools in the city of Frederico Westphalen, Brazil, to the intervention group (five schools) or control group (five schools). The study included 473 students aged 6 to 12 and 32 teachers. Baseline assessments included weight, height, physical activity, food intake, and health knowledge in children; and physical activity and food consumption in teachers. Measurements were repeated after the intervention was completed.
Advertisement

The intervention had two stages: teacher training followed by students in the classroom. Teachers attended four meetings over a four-month period, were given a booklet, and had access to video lessons. The material was in seven chapters:

  1. risk factors for cardiovascular diseases in childhood;
  2. choice of healthy foods;
  3. food labeling;
  4. sodium, sugars, and fats;
  5. emotional health and quality of life;
  6. physical activity; and
  7. healthy practices and changes in habits.

Each section contained theory plus suggestions for classroom activities based on the theme, age of the children, and intended goals.

In the classroom, teachers covered one theme per week, including at least one activity. Teachers were free to choose or amend the activities and could incorporate them into projects based on the school's syllabus. To encourage teacher participation, a group was created on a social network where they received messages and reminders from the researcher on the topic they were supposed to work on. Teachers also shared their own experiences. The researcher visited the intervention schools to stimulate teachers and offer guidance.

For the control group schools, teachers did not participate in the training course and students attended the school's usual classes about health and healthy eating based on the curriculum.

Both students and teachers benefitted from the intervention. The proportion of students following Brazilian Food Guide advice to avoid pizza/hamburgers and soft drinks increased significantly by 15% and 20%, respectively. In addition, there was a 28% increase in the number of teachers who were physically active.

Dr. Santin Dal Ri said: "Children in both the intervention and control groups increased their level of health knowledge during the study. But only those in the intervention group changed their eating behaviors. This suggests that information on its own does not lead to lifestyle improvements. In our study, a program that combined information with playful activities and emotional support was beneficial for children and teachers."

Source: Eurekalert
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
News Category
What's New on Medindia
Link between Dietary Intake of Plant-based Essential Fatty Acids and Death Risk
Aspirin may be Harmful When Used for Preventing 1st Heart Attack, Stroke
Pregnancy Complications Elevated Among Symptomatic COVID-19 Women
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Processed Foods Height and Weight-Kids Why Do We Eat - Nutrition Facts Diet Lifestyle and Heart Disease Lifestyle Modification: No Big Deal! Healthy Living Hunger Fullness and Weight Control Label Lingo on Food Items: Decoded Tips for Healthy Fasting During Ramadhan Top Diet Foods that Make you Fat 

Recommended Reading
Fast Food Addiction in Teenagers
Food addiction is a growing threat among teenagers. Find out how to combat the problem with ......
Junk Food and Energy Drinks may Affect Brain Development in Teens
Energy drinks and junk food consumption is increasing among teens and is affecting their brain ......
Junk Food Makes You Dumb and Forgetful
Experiments link junk foods to memory loss. Rats on a poor diet were found to lose memory in as ......
Junk Food Diet During Pregnancy Turns the Child into Junk Food Addict
Eating junk food during pregnancy can make children addicts to junk foods, finds new study....
Hunger Fullness and Weight Control
An erratic way of eating or any metabolic disturbance in the hunger fullness signals is one of the m...
Label Lingo on Food Items: Decoded
Read on to become a “pro” in “label reading” and don’t get tricked by fancy promotions of food produ...
Lifestyle Modification: No Big Deal!
Simple and practically possible lifestyle changes can make a huge difference in improving our health...
Processed Foods
Processed or convenience foods require less time and energy for food preparation. Most of the proces...
Tips for Healthy Fasting During Ramadhan
Ramadhan calls for a change in your food habits, and to help you glide through it easily, here we’ve...
Top Diet Foods that Make you Fat
Every nutrition fad comes with its share of diet foods. While they seem healthy, many diet foods pro...
Why Do We Eat - Nutrition Facts
The importance of eating food and the physiological, psychological and social functions of food....

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2021

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use