About My Health Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

High-intensity Exercise Program can Control Blood Sugar Levels

by Hannah Joy on May 16, 2018 at 3:15 PM
Font : A-A+

High-intensity Exercise Program can Control Blood Sugar Levels

A 6-week high-intensity exercise program can help control blood sugar levels and decrease heart disease risk in patients with Type 2 diabetes, reveals a new study.

Diabetes is a lifelong condition that causes a person's blood sugar level to become too high. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form, which is where the body doesn't produce enough of the hormone that controls sugar levels, called insulin.

Advertisement


People with Type 2 diabetes are at significantly higher risk of heart disease. A primary focus for managing diabetes is exercise, as it has been shown to improve the body's ability to control sugar levels by making the body more sensitive to the insulin produced.

The new research was published in Experimental Physiology. However, adherence to exercise advice is particularly low amongst those with Type 2 diabetes, who are mostly overweight or obese, with lack of time being cited as one of the greatest barriers to regular exercise. This new research suggests that a high intensity exercise program such as CrossFit improves the ability of the body to control blood sugar levels by reducing the amount of insulin required.
Advertisement

Importantly, these improvements appear to be similar to the sort of change we would expect from more traditional exercise interventions, despite participants spending considerably less time exercising than health guidelines recommend. CrossFit therefore offers a time-effective exercise approach for people with Type 2 diabetes who struggle to maintain daily exercise.

CrossFit™ is a high intensity training intervention incorporating both endurance and strength training. Sessions range from 8-20 minutes in duration and represent a far more time-effective form of exercise than traditional exercise interventions.

CrossFit™ has been growing in popularity over the past decade, although until now it was not clear whether such forms of exercise would improve the ability of individuals with Type 2 diabetes to control their sugar levels.

For this research, thirteen overweight/obese patients with Type 2 diabetes were recruited to participate in a 6-week CrossFit™ exercise program. Participants' blood sugar levels and insulin sensitivity (an individual's ability to reduce high blood sugar levels effectively) were assessed both before and after the exercise program, in addition to their blood chemistries and blood pressure, which were tested to predict heart disease risk.

The post-exercise intervention test results showed significant improvements in insulin sensitivity and heart disease risk factors. Importantly, these improvements appeared to be similar to the sort of changes expected from more traditional exercise interventions, despite participants spending considerably less time exercising than such guidelines recommend.

The limitations of this study are that it tested a relatively small number of patients, the duration of the exercise intervention was short, and the subject population was relatively young. As such, caution should be applied when extending these results, especially to more elderly patients with Type 2 diabetes. However, the results pave the way for larger studies to assess the efficacy, feasibility and durability of this study's approach.

Such studies might need to take more definitive measures of insulin resistance, which would require sophisticated clinical approaches that include infusion of glucose and insulin.

Professor John Kirwan, co-author of the paper, shared a story about one participant's involvement in the intervention which had particularly surprised him:

"One lady started the intervention clearly motivated, and ended it quite exhilarated by the experience. The intervention had a surprisingly large effect on her fasting blood sugar, which fell from 250 mg/dL to around 90 mg/dL (normal range) - effectively remission of her diabetes! She has since continued with CrossFit™, and we hope it will serve her well into the future. Whilst an outlier, such an example provides promise to those who may be pessimistic about the possibilities of these types of interventions."



Source: Eurekalert
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
News Category
What's New on Medindia
Is COVID-19 Vaccination during Pregnancy Safe?
Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD)
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Thalassemia Diabetes - Essentials Diabetes - Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose (SMBG) Diet Lifestyle and Heart Disease Tips to Live Longer Decoding HbA1c Test for Blood Sugar Exercise and Fitness Lifestyle Modification: No Big Deal! Body Types and Befitting Workouts Exercise To Gain Weight 

Recommended Reading
Dementia Patients Benefit from Holistic Exercise Program
While patients with dementia can often suffer from depression and declining physical and mental ......
12-Week Exercise Program Improved Testosterone Levels In Obese Men
Twelve weeks of aerobic exercise significantly boosted testosterone levels in men with the greatest ...
Exercise Program Reduces Complications Of Lung Cancer Surgery By Half
Exercise before surgery in lung cancer patients might reduce the complication rate and length of ......
Body Types and Befitting Workouts
Workout and diet which is well suited for a pear shaped body....
Decoding HbA1c Test for Blood Sugar
The HbA1c assay is the gold-standard measurement of chronic glycemia and measures the amount of gluc...
Diabetes - Essentials
Diabetes is a metabolic disease caused by insulin deficiency that leads to high blood sugar levels a...
Diabetes - Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose (SMBG)
Self-Monitoring Of Blood Glucose (SMBG) is one of the greatest advancements in the management of Di...
Exercise and Fitness
Exercise is about revamping your lifestyle, not just weight loss. Exercise to get healthy – that way...
Exercise To Gain Weight
Are you underweight and want to know how to gain weight? Exercise or workouts can help you gain weig...
Lifestyle Modification: No Big Deal!
Simple and practically possible lifestyle changes can make a huge difference in improving our health...
Thalassemia
Thalassemia is an inherited blood disorder passed on through parental genes causing the body to prod...
Tips to Live Longer
Though life is temporary and short, it is possible to maximize the span of our existence by living h...

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2021

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use