About My Health Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Genome Sequence Giving Clue to Pesticide Resistance

by Gopalan on November 14, 2007 at 11:40 AM
Font : A-A+

Genome Sequence Giving Clue to Pesticide Resistance

Researchers in the University of Melbourne, Australia say they have identified the genome sequence of 12 fly species that consume compost.

That could prove a landmark development as the defence mechanism of pests against pesticides has now become clearer.

Advertisement

The Nature paper reports the analysis of the sequence of the genomes of 12 different species of Drosophila (fruit flies) by a huge international team.

Researchers Dr. Charles Robin, Robert Good (Research Assistant), Lloyd Low (PhD student) and Associate Professor Phil Batterham, from the Centre for Environmental Stress and Adaptation Research (CESAR) at the Bio21 Institute of Molecular Science and Biotechnology, looked at a large family of genes, some of which are involved in breaking down any poisons that the flies might consume.
Advertisement

Associate Professor Batterham who led the research says the comparison of the 12 genomes has allowed the genes that are likely to be involved in breaking down poisons to be identified.

"This genetic discovery of the Drosophila (flies) is critical in pointing to the genes that form the defence system of insect pests."

"In pest insects such as blowflies and mosquitoes, the counterparts to these genes may be responsible for the break down of the chemical insecticides that are used to control them."

Associate Professor Batterham says what is unique about these flies is that they feed on the yeast found on decomposing fruit and vegetable matter.

"They do not consume healthy fruit. However, while Drosophila flies are not pests, they are closely related to insect pest species."

"Genome sequences of pest insects are needed, so that we might find ways of evading the defence systems of pest insects to reduce their impact on human health and agriculture."

"This is of particular concern in countries with large agriculture industries such as Australia and the US."

According to the paper, this international study provides an extensive resource for the study of sequence genetic diversity in a species, for which the Drosophila is an excellent model.

Source: Medindia
GPL/P
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Advertisement
News Category
What's New on Medindia
January is the Thyroid Awareness Month in 2022
Menstrual Disorders
Coffee May Help You Fight Endometrial Cancer
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Organic Foods Organophosphorus Poisoning Pesticide Poisoning 

Recommended Reading
Personal Genomics: To Each His Own
James Watson, was handed down his very own personal genome. Scientists and physicians reckon if the ...
Organic Foods
Organic Foods are produced by the ‘natural method’, without the use of chemicals like pesticides, f...
Organophosphorus Poisoning
Organosphosphorus compounds are used as insecticides and chemical warfare. They are easily accessibl...
Pesticide Poisoning
Pesticide poisoning occurs when chemicals intended to control pests harm humans, wildlife. Treatment...

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2022

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use
open close
ASK A DOCTOR ONLINE
I have read and I do accept terms of use - Telemedicine

Advantage Medindia: FREE subscription for 'Personalised Health & Wellness website with consultation' (Value Rs.300/-)