About My Health Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Future of Skin Electronics

by Colleen Fleiss on February 19, 2018 at 2:41 AM
Font : A-A+

Future of Skin Electronics

Japanese researchers develop a new ultrathin, elastic display that fits snugly on the skin can show the moving waveform of an electrocardiogram recorded by a breathable, on-skin electrode sensor. Combined with a wireless communication module, this integrated biomedical sensor system - called "skin electronics" - can transmit biometric data to the cloud. This latest research by a Japanese academic-industrial collaboration, led by Professor Takao Someya at the University of Tokyo's Graduate School of Engineering, is slated for a news briefing and talk at the AAAS Annual Meeting in Austin, Texas.

Thanks to advances in semiconductor technology, wearable devices can now monitor health by first measuring vital signs or taking an electrocardiogram, and then transmitting the data wirelessly to a smartphone. The readings or electrocardiogram waveforms can be displayed on the screen in real time, or sent to either the cloud or a memory device where the information is stored.

Advertisement


The newly-developed skin electronics system aims to go a step further by enhancing information accessibility for people such as the elderly or the infirm, who tend to have difficulty operating and obtaining data from existing devices and interfaces. It promises to help ease the strain on home healthcare systems in aging societies through continuous, non-invasive health monitoring and self-care at home.

The new integrated system combines a flexible, deformable display with a lightweight sensor composed of a breathable nanomesh electrode and wireless communication module. Medical data measured by the sensor, such as an electrocardiogram, can either be sent wirelessly to a smartphone for viewing or to the cloud for storage. In the latest research, the display showed a moving electrocardiogram waveform that was stored in memory. The skin display, developed by a collaboration between researchers at the University of Tokyo's Graduate School of Engineering and Dai Nippon Printing (DNP), a leading Japanese printing company, consists of a 16 x 24 array of micro LEDs and stretchable wiring mounted on a rubber sheet. "Our skin display exhibits simple graphics with motion," says Someya. "Because it is made from thin and soft materials, it can be deformed freely."
Advertisement

The display is stretchable by as much as 45 percent of its original length. It is far more resistant to the wear and tear of stretching than previous wearable displays. It is built on a novel structure that minimizes the stress resulting from stretching on the juncture of hard materials, such as the micro LEDs, and soft materials, like the elastic wiring - a leading cause of damage for other models.

It is the first stretchable display to achieve superior durability and stability in air, such that not a single pixel failed in the matrix-type display while attached snugly onto the skin and continuously subjected to the stretching and contracting motion of the body.

The nanomesh skin sensor can be worn on the skin continuously for a week without causing any inflammation. Although this sensor, developed in an earlier study, was capable of measuring temperature, pressure and myoelectricity (the electrical properties of muscle), it successfully recorded an electrocardiogram for the first time in the latest research. The researchers applied tried-and-true methods used in the mass production of electronics - specifically, screen printing the silver wiring and mounting the micro LEDs on the rubber sheet with a chip mounter and solder paste commonly used in manufacturing printed circuit boards. Applying these methods will likely accelerate the commercialization of the display and help keep down future production costs.

DNP is looking to bring the integrated skin display to market within the next three years by improving the reliability of the stretchable devices through optimizing its structure, enhancing the production process for high integration, and overcoming technical challenges such as large-area coverage.

"The current aging society requires user-friendly wearable sensors for monitoring patient vitals in order to reduce the burden on patients and family members providing nursing care," says Someya. "Our system could serve as one of the long-awaited solutions to fulfill this need, which will ultimately lead to improving the quality of life for many."

Source: Eurekalert
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
News Category
What's New on Medindia
Link between Dietary Intake of Plant-based Essential Fatty Acids and Death Risk
Aspirin may be Harmful When Used for Preventing 1st Heart Attack, Stroke
Pregnancy Complications Elevated Among Symptomatic COVID-19 Women
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Boils / Skin Abscess Pityriasis rosea Pemphigus Hives Scleroderma Vitiligo Skin Self Examination Dermatomyostitis 

Recommended Reading
Electrocardiogram
An ECG is a diagnostic test that records the electrical activity of the heart and helps to detect .....
Self-healing Electronic Skin Developed
Scientists develop electronic skin that can repair itself. The E-skin can be used in biomedical ......
Ultrathin Electronic Skin to Measure Heart Rate and Blood Oxygen Level
The e-skin measures the blood oxygen level when stuck on a finger. It contains microelectronic ......
'Electronic Skin' - The Latest on Research
Skin is the largest organ in the body and communicates even the most subtle touch. This helps in ......
Boils / Skin Abscess
Encyclopedia section of medindia gives general info about Boils / Skin Abscess ...
Dermatomyostitis
Dermatomyostitis (DM) is an uncommon, inflammatory disease affecting the connective tissues. It is c...
Hives
Hives or Urticaria are allergic skin reaction that appear suddenly in clusters or as single bumps on...
Pemphigus
Pemphigus is a rare group of autoimmune diseases that affect the skin and mucous membranes causing b...
Pityriasis Rosea
Pityriasis rosea is a common skin disease that is not contagious. It manifests as oval-shaped, pink ...
Scleroderma
Scleroderma or CREST syndrome is a chronic, auto immune disease which manifests as thick, dry, fibro...
Skin Self Examination
The skin self examination means checking one’s own skin for any visible abnormal growths or unusual ...
Vitiligo
Vitiligo is a skin disease characterized by patches of unpigmented skin. Vitiligo is usually slowly ...

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2021

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use