About My Health Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Electrical Brain Stimulation Boosts Dexterity: Research

by Rajashri on October 29, 2008 at 3:54 PM
Font : A-A+

 Electrical Brain Stimulation Boosts Dexterity: Research

New research indicates that stimulating the brain with a non-invasive technique called transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) can improve a person's skill at handling delicate tasks.

According to the Drs. Gottfried Schlaug and Bradley Vines from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, tDCS could improve the use of a person's non-dominant hand.

Advertisement

In tDCS, electrodes are attached to the scalp and a weak direct current is passed the scalp and skull to alter the excitability of the underlying brain tissue.

The treatment has two principal modes depending on the direction in which the current runs between the two electrodes. Brain tissue that underlies the positive electrode (anode) becomes more excitable, and it is the other way round for brain tissue that underlies the negative electrode (cathode).
Advertisement

For the study, the researchers tested the effects of tDCS over one side or both sides of the brain on sixteen healthy, right-handed volunteers, as well as testing the effect of simply pretending to carry out the procedure. The test involved using the fingers of the left hand to key in a series of numbers displayed on a computer screen.

The participants were didn't know which of the three procedures they were receiving.

The researchers saw striking results- a 24 percent improvement in the subjects' scores was seen after stimulating the brain over both the right and left motor regions ('dual hemisphere' tDCS), much better than stimulating the brain only over one motor region or using the sham treatment.

There were no relevant negative side effects with this type of non-invasive brain stimulation.

The tDCS is different from electroconvulsive therapy, which uses currents around a thousand times higher.

"The results of our study are relevant to clinical research on motor recovery after stroke. They point to the possibility that stimulating both sides of the brain simultaneously, using the effects of the direct current to block unwanted effects of one motor region while using the opposite effects of the direct current treatment on the other motor region to enhance and facilitate the function of that motor region might catalyze motor recovery," said Schlaug.

The study was published in the open access journal BMC Neuroscience.

Source: ANI
RAS/SK
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Advertisement
News Category
What's New on Medindia
Woman with Rare Spinal Cord Defect from Birth Sues Doctor
Toothache
World AIDS Day 2021 - End Inequalities, End AIDS
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Parkinsons Disease Parkinsons Disease Surgical Treatment Brain Brain Facts Ataxia Language Areas in The Brain Ways to Improve your Intelligence Quotient (IQ) 

Recommended Reading
Bell's Palsy
Bell''s palsy is facial nerve disorder that causes weakness of the muscles on one side of the face. ...
Poliomyelitis
Polio is an infectious disease caused by the poliovirus. It results in paralysis and generally ......
Paralyzed Monkeys Able to Move Arms Via Artificial Brain-muscle Connections
American researchers have successfully restored movement to monkeys with their arms temporarily ......
Ataxia
Ataxia affects coordination. Gait becomes unstable and the patient loses balance. The cerebellum or ...
Language Areas in The Brain
The mechanism of how human brain processes the language to express and comprehend the verbal, writte...
Parkinsons Disease
Parkinson’s disease is a neurodegenerative disease caused by progressive dopamine brain cells loss. ...
Ways to Improve your Intelligence Quotient (IQ)
Intelligence quotient (IQ) is a psychological measure of human intelligence. Regular physical and me...

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2021

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use