About Careers Internship MedBlog Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Clues for Bladder Regeneration in Humans Might Be Offered By Mammal Model

by Rukmani Krishna on October 15, 2012 at 11:46 PM
Font : A-A+

 Clues for Bladder Regeneration in Humans Might Be Offered By Mammal Model

Researchers have reported on the regenerative process that enables rats to re-grow their bladders within eight weeks in a new study.

Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center's Institute for Regenerative Medicine researchers have characterized this unique model of bladder regeneration with the goal of applying what they learn to human patients.

Advertisement

"A better understanding of the regenerative process at the molecular and cellular level is a key to more rapid progress in applying regenerative medicine to help patients," George Christ, senior researcher of the study, said.

In a previous study by Christ's team, research in rats showed that when about 75 percent of the animals' bladders were removed, they were able to regenerate a complete functional bladder within eight weeks. The current study focused on how the regeneration occurs.
Advertisement

"There is very little data on the mechanisms involved in organ regeneration in mammals," Christ said.

"To our knowledge, bladder regeneration holds a unique position - there is no other mammalian organ capable of this type of regeneration," he said.

The ability of the liver to grow in size when lobes are removed is sometimes referred to as regeneration, but this is a misnomer, said co-author Bryon Petersen.

Instead, through a proliferation of cells, the remaining tissue grows to compensate for the lost size. In contrast, the hallmark of true regeneration is following nature's "pattern" to exactly duplicate size, form and function, Petersen said.

"If we can understand the bladder's regenerative process, the hope is that we can prompt the regeneration of other organs and tissues where structure is important - from the intestine and spinal cord to the heart," Petersen said.

The current study showed that the animals' bodies responded to the bladder removal by increasing the rate at which certain cells divided and grew. The most notable proliferative response occurred initially in the urothelium, the layer of tissue that lines the bladder.

As the proliferative activity in the bladder lining waned, it continued elsewhere: in the fibrous band (lamina propria) that separates the bladder lining from the bladder muscles and in the bladder muscle itself.

The researchers have several theories about how the process works, said Christ.

One possibility is that cells in the bladder lining transition and become a type of stem cell that can proliferate throughout the bladder. Other theories are that cells in the bladder lining signal other cells to replicate and that injury prompts stem cells to arrive through the blood stream to repair the bladder damage.

The study has been published in PLOS ONE.

Source: ANI
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
What's New on Medindia
Alarming Cesarean Section Trends in India - Convenience or Compulsion of Corporate Healthcare
Quiz on Low-Calorie Diet for Diabetes
World Heart Day in 2022- Use Heart for Every Heart
View all
Recommended Reading
News Archive
Date
Category
Advertisement
News Category

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Vesico-Ureteric Reflux Causing UTI in Children Enuresis/Bedwetting Interstitial Cystitis Bladder Cancer 

Most Popular on Medindia

Drug Interaction Checker Sanatogen Indian Medical Journals Turmeric Powder - Health Benefits, Uses & Side Effects Loram (2 mg) (Lorazepam) Calculate Ideal Weight for Infants Drug Side Effects Calculator Find a Hospital Find a Doctor Post-Nasal Drip
This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use
×

Clues for Bladder Regeneration in Humans Might Be Offered By Mammal Model Personalised Printable Document (PDF)

Please complete this form and we'll send you a personalised information that is requested

You may use this for your own reference or forward it to your friends.

Please use the information prudently. If you are not a medical doctor please remember to consult your healthcare provider as this information is not a substitute for professional advice.

Name *

Email Address *

Country *

Areas of Interests