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Chemical in Insecticides Linked to Slow Cognitive Development of Babies

by Kathy Jones on February 11, 2011 at 8:11 PM
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 Chemical in Insecticides Linked to Slow Cognitive Development of Babies

A new research has found that children whose mothers inhaled a chemical that is commonly found in insecticide during their pregnancies displayed a slower rate of mental development.

Researchers from the Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health analyzed the effect of inhaling piperonyl butoxide, or PBO, a chemical found in insecticides that are widely used in indoor bug sprays.

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The researchers found that the children of those mothers who had inhaled the highest amounts of the chemical averaged 3.9 points lower than the normal average of 85 points on the mental development test by the age of three years.

One of the researchers, Megan Horton said that the study is an important one since it suggests that the kids will not be able to do well when they enter the school. Horton went on to say that the chemical is more harmful to baby brains since they are not fully developed.

"It means that these kids might not do as well in school later on. If you alter the blueprint, there may be lasting long-term consequences", the researchers wrote in their report published in the journal, Pediatrics.


Source: Medindia
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