About My Health Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Bi-racial Asian Americans More Vulnerable to Psychological Disorder Than Monoracial

by Gopalan on August 18, 2008 at 12:53 PM
Font : A-A+

 Bi-racial Asian Americans More Vulnerable to Psychological Disorder Than Monoracial

Bi-racial Asian Americans more vulnerable to psychological disorder than the monoracial, suggests a new study.

The study, done by the Asian American Center on Disparities Research at the University of California, covered Chinese-Caucasian, Filipino-Caucasian, Japanese-Caucasian and Vietnamese-Caucasian individuals.

Advertisement

"Up to 2.4 percent of the U.S. population self-identifies as mixed race, and most of these individuals describe themselves as biracial," said Nolan Zane, a professor of psychology and Asian American studies at UC Davis. "We cannot underestimate the importance of understanding the social, psychological and experiential differences that may increase the likelihood of psychological disorders among this fast-growing segment of the population."

Zane and his co-investigator, UC Davis psychology graduate student Lauren Berger, found that 34 percent of biracial individuals in a national survey had been diagnosed with a psychological disorder, such as anxiety, depression or substance abuse, versus 17 percent of monoracial individuals. The higher rate held up even after the researchers controlled for differences between the groups in age, gender and life stress, among other factors.
Advertisement

The study included information from 125 biracial Asian Americans from across the U.S., including 55 Filipino-Caucasians, 33 Chinese-Caucasians, 23 Japanese-Caucasians and 14 Vietnamese-Caucasians.

The information was obtained from the 2002-2003 National Latino and Asian American Study, the largest nationally representative survey ever conducted of Asian Americans. Funded by the National Institute of Mental Health, the landmark survey involved in-person interviews with more than 2,000 Asian Americans nationwide. The survey yielded a wealth of raw data for researchers to analyze for insights into Asian American mental health.

Zane and Berger did not look at the mental health of non-Asian Americans.

Future research should investigate the factors that explain the higher rate of diagnosed psychological disorders among biracial Asian Americans, Zane said. Possibilities include influences of ethnic identification and experiences of ethnic discrimination.

Source: Medindia
GPL/L
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Advertisement
News Category
What's New on Medindia
Turmeric: Magic Ingredient to Keep you Healthy in Winter
Top 7 Benefits of Good Oral Hygiene
Healthy and Safer Thanksgiving 2021
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Loss of Taste 

Recommended Reading
Racial Discrimination Has Different Mental Health Effects on Asians
Racial discrimination has different mental health effects on Asians:First national study of Asians ....
Dialysis Industry Cites Racial Disparities in Marketing Anemia Drugs
The kidney dialysis industry has begun to highlight concerns about racial disparities to "fend ...
Despite Efforts, Racial Differences Persist in Cancer Cure
In the last 10 years to mitigate cancer treatment disparities, black patients are significantly ......
Loss of Taste
Symptom of loss of taste usually occurs in combination with loss of smell and can be complete loss o...

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2021

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use