About My Health Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Anti-Malaria Drug Do Not Help Treat Diabetes

by Bidita Debnath on November 4, 2017 at 11:28 PM
Font : A-A+

 Anti-Malaria Drug Do Not Help Treat Diabetes

Diabetes is a number of diseases that involve problems with the hormone insulin. In the United States, around 30 million people live with diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. So any news of a potential new treatment is a big deal.

A drug used to treat malaria does not, after all, create new insulin-producing cells, according to a new paper from researchers at the University of California, Davis. The work, published in Cell Metabolism, refutes a study published in Cell in January.

Advertisement


"First we had hoped that we would be able to replicate the findings, but they didn't hold up," said Mark Huising, in the Department of Neurobiology, Physiology and Behavior, UC Davis College of Biological Sciences. "People with Type 1 diabetes, they see these stories come out and they think maybe there's something on the horizon and then nothing ever follows through," Huising said.

Understanding diabetes at the cellular level

The symptoms of Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes are quite similar but the underlying causes differ. In type 1 diabetes, the body fails to create enough insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas that regulates cellular intake of nutrients. In Type 2 diabetes, cells no longer respond efficiently to insulin.
Advertisement

Insulin is produced in hormone-producing regions of the pancreas called islets. Within the islets are alpha and beta cells. Beta cells are integral to creating insulin.

"That's the cell that if you lose (insulin production), you get Type 1 diabetes," said Huising. So there is always interest in any process that might generate new beta cells to replace those lost in Type 1 diabetes.

An eye-catching 'discovery'

In early 2017, in a paper published in the journal Cell, a European team reported that the antimalarial drug artemether could convert alpha cells into functional beta cells. While alpha cells converting into beta cells had been described before, this was the first time an existing drug had been reported to stimulate the process and it caused a lot of excitement in the field, Huising said.

Outfitted with the precision tools to capture alpha-to-beta cellular conversion, Huising enlisted graduate student Sharon Lee to assist with replicating the original experiment.

"We were hoping, expecting, to confirm," Huising said. "We weren't able to."

The importance of reproducibility

For her experiments, Lee used pancreatic islets derived from mice. After around four months of experiments with artemether, it was clear that the drug was not triggering alpha to beta cell conversion, as the initial Cell paper had claimed.

Lee and Huising's paper highlights the importance of reproducibility, a perennial and hotly contested topic of concern at all levels of scientific research. It also demonstrates how routine lab assignments meant to educate students can provide the foundations for published research.

"It's important to realize that our work has an impact in the real world," Huising said. "We should continuously strive to hold ourselves and our peers to a higher standard, particularly when we talk about discoveries that promise a possible cure for diabetes."

Source: Eurekalert
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Advertisement
News Category
What's New on Medindia
International Day of Persons with Disabilities 2021 - Fighting for Rights in the Post-COVID Era
Effect of Blood Group Type on COVID-19 Risk and Severity
Woman with Rare Spinal Cord Defect from Birth Sues Doctor
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Diabetic Retinopathy Drug Toxicity Diabetes Diabetic Diet Diabetes - Essentials Diabetes - Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose (SMBG) Insulin Delivery Devices Diabetes and Exercise Signature Drug Toxicity Stress Relief Through Alternative Medicine 

Recommended Reading
Sugary Drinks Increase Risk of Diabetes, Heart Disease and Stroke
Drinking soda or juices regularly were found to be associated with metabolic syndrome, heart ......
High Rate of Needle Reuse Among Diabetes Patients in India
Some people with diabetes use their insulin syringes more than once to save money. But makers of ......
Obesity and Diabetes Rates High Among Neglected Groups
Understudied racial minority groups in U.S show alarmingly high rates of obesity and diabetes than ....
Insulin Sensitizers Without Side Effects For Diabetes Management
Drugs that improve insulin sensitivity can also increase lipid levels. Developing molecules that ......
Diabetes
A comprehensive article on diabetes - both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes, including : causes, signs, sy...
Diabetes - Essentials
Diabetes is a metabolic disease caused by insulin deficiency that leads to high blood sugar levels a...
Diabetes - Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose (SMBG)
Self-Monitoring Of Blood Glucose (SMBG) is one of the greatest advancements in the management of Di...
Diabetes and Exercise
Regular exercise especially in type II diabetes not only helps reduce the sugar but also reduces the...
Diabetic Diet
The diabetic diet most often recommended is high in dietary fiber (especially soluble fiber) and nut...
Diabetic Retinopathy
The term ‘diabetic retinopathy’ refers to changes in the retina which often occur in people with ......
Drug Toxicity
Drug toxicity is an adverse reaction of the body towards a drug that results as a side effect of a d...
Insulin Delivery Devices
Insulin delivery devices have evolved drastically since their invention in 1922. They are all aimed ...

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2021

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use