About Careers MedBlog Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

African American Women More Resistant to Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Aspirin Than White American Women

by Bidita Debnath on June 24, 2014 at 8:45 PM
Font : A-A+

 African American Women More Resistant to Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Aspirin Than White American Women

New research finds that African American women respond differently to the anti-inflammatory effect of aspirin than do white American women.

The results were presented Monday, June 23 at ICE/ENDO 2014, the joint meeting of the International Society of Endocrinology and the Endocrine Society in Chicago. "African American women appear to be more resistant than white American women to the anti-inflammatory benefits of aspirin in reducing cardiovascular disease and its risk factors," said lead study author Nora Alghothani, MD, MPH, endocrinology fellow in the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, & Metabolism at The Ohio State University in Columbus.

Advertisement

Even though African American women have higher high-density lipoprotein (HDL, the "good" cholesterol) and lower triglyceride levels, they also have increased insulin resistance, oxidative stress burden, proinflammatory markers, HDL dysfunctionality - and significantly higher mortality. Aspirin therapy has been recommended to reduce subclinical atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease outcomes, including stroke.In their pilot study of 21 African American and 21 white American nondiabetic postmenopausal women with subclinical atherosclerosis, Dr. Alghothani and her colleagues randomly assigned half the women in each group to receive 325 mg of enteric-coated aspirin and half of them to receive an identical placebo, every day for 6 months.

The researchers looked at the subclinical pro-inflammatory markers hsCRP and IL-6 to compare the anti-inflammatory response to aspirin therapy between the AAW and WAW groups.
Advertisement

After 6 months, while hsCRP increased in both AAW and WAW placebo groups, and remained essentially unchanged in the aspirin-treated AAW group, it decreased by 25% in the aspirin-treated WAW group. While IL-6 increased in both placebo groups and in the aspirin-treated AAW group, it decreased by 48% in the aspirin-treated WAW group.

The African American women appeared to be more resistant to the anti-inflammatory properties of aspirin.

"Aspirin therapy has long been recommended to help reduce poor cardiovascular disease outcomes. Its benefits, however, may be different among African Americans compared with white Americans. This research shows an overall blunted response to the anti-inflammatory properties of aspirin among African Americans, and it suggests that a higher dose may be required in African Americans to achieve better cardiovascular disease prevention and lessen disparities among the different ethnic groups," Dr. Alghothani advised.

Source: Eurekalert
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
What's New on Medindia
Test  Your Knowledge on Heart
Test Your Knowlege on Genes
Obesity in Teens Make Inroads into Early Atrial Fibrillation
View all
Recommended Reading
News Archive
Date
Category
Advertisement
News Category

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Chemotherapy Chemotherapy Drugs Anticoagulants Healthy Living Reye’s Syndrome Colon Polyps Top Ten Foods That Trigger Inflammation 

Most Popular on Medindia

Sinopril (2mg) (Lacidipine) Selfie Addiction Calculator Turmeric Powder - Health Benefits, Uses & Side Effects A-Z Drug Brands in India Blood - Sugar Chart Diaphragmatic Hernia Vent Forte (Theophylline) How to Reduce School Bag Weight - Simple Tips Accident and Trauma Care Color Blindness Calculator
This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use
×

African American Women More Resistant to Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Aspirin Than White American Women Personalised Printable Document (PDF)

Please complete this form and we'll send you a personalised information that is requested

You may use this for your own reference or forward it to your friends.

Please use the information prudently. If you are not a medical doctor please remember to consult your healthcare provider as this information is not a substitute for professional advice.

Name *

Email Address *

Country *

Areas of Interests