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13,000 Years Ago Humans Started Recycling Tools

by Rukmani Krishna on September 25, 2012 at 11:36 PM
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 13,000 Years Ago Humans Started Recycling Tools

Humans from the Upper Palaeolithic Age recycled their stone artefacts to be put to other uses, a new study has revealed.

The study conducted at the Universitat Rovira i Virgili and the Catalan Institute of Human Paleoecology and Social Evolution (IPHES) is based on burnt artefacts found in the Moli del Salt site in Tarragona, Spain.

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"In order to identify the recycling, it is necessary to differentiate the two stages of the manipulation sequence of an object: the moment before it is altered and the moment after. The two are separated by an interval in which the artefact has undergone some form of alteration. This is the first time a systematic study of this type has been performed," Manuel Vaquero, researcher at the Universitat Rovira i Virgili, explained to SINC.

The archaeologists found a high percentage of burnt remains in the Moli del Salt site (Tarragona), which date back to the end of the Upper Palaeolithic Age some 13,000 years ago. The expert ensures that "we chose these burnt artefacts because they can tell us in a very simple way whether they have been modified after being exposed to fire."
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The results indicate that the recycling of tools was normal during the Upper Palaeolithic Age. However, this practice is not documented in the same way as other types of artefacts. The use of recycled tools was more common for domestic activities and seems to be associated with immediate needs.

Recycling is linked to expedited behaviour, which means simply shaped and quickly available tools as and when the need arises. Tools used for hunting, like projectile points for instance, were almost never made from recycled artefacts. In contrast, double artefacts (those that combine two tools within the same item) were recycled more often.

"This indicates that a large part of these tools were not conceived from the outset as double artefacts but a single tool was made first and a second was added later when the artefact was recycled," the researcher indicated.

The history of the artefacts and the sequence of changes that they have undergone over time are fundamental in understanding their final morphology.

According to Vaquero, "in terms of the objects, this is mostly important from a cultural value point of view, especially in periods like the Upper Palaeolithic Age, in which it is thought that the sharper the object the sharper the mind."

The study appeared in the 'Journal of Archaeological Science'.

Source: ANI
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