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MDR-TB Spreading in Slums of Nairobi, Kenya, Health Workers Say

by Medindia Content Team on  April 4, 2007 at 12:28 PM General Health News   - G J E 4
MDR-TB Spreading in Slums of Nairobi, Kenya, Health Workers Say
Multi-drug resistant tuberculosis is spreading in the slums of Kenya's capital, Nairobi, some health workers have said recently, IRIN News reports.
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According to a 2004 report by the Kenya Medical Research Institute, about 70% of Nairobi's population lives in slums, and a large proportion of HIV-positive people who also have TB reside in slums.

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Liesbet Ohler, a TB coordinator for Medecins Sans Frontieres, said that the "dark and airless" homes in the slums provide the optimal environment for TB to thrive. She added that stigma also might cause people with TB to interrupt their treatment regimens, which can lead to the development of MDR-TB. "Here in Kenya, so many people are HIV and TB coinfected, so if you say (you have) TB, people assume (you are infected with) HIV," Ohler said.

Kenya has recorded 46 cases of MDR-TB, but the actual figure could be much higher, Dave Muthama, program officer for Kenya's National Leprosy and TB Control Program, said. Sputum tests often do not detect TB in people with HIV, so the most effective way of diagnosing TB in HIV-positive people is by culture testing.

"It is difficult to get good cultures, therefore it is difficult to work out what proportion of patients" has MDR-TB, Christine Genevier, MSF's head of mission, said. According to Ohler, people with HIV have reduced levels of the TB bacilli in their sputum, so their sputum tests often come back negative and their chest X-rays might look normal.

She added that the "immune system is weakened, so the disease develops with less visible signs -- less TB is needed to make a person ill with the disease -- so people need to be treated on clinical signs before it is too late." In addition, there are not enough laboratories in the country, difficulties in diagnosing HIV in people with TB and insufficient follow-up among people taking TB treatment, Genevier said.

The Kenyan government does not provide MDR-TB treatment, which costs roughly $6,000 for a full course, compared with roughly $20 for a course of regular TB treatment, IRIN News reports.

According to Muthama, the government is taking action to curb the spread of MDR-TB. "We have treatment centers where we are monitoring treatment as well as watching the patients," Muthama said, adding, "The patients are tested after one-and-a-half months to see if they are responding well, and from here we should be able to see if people have resistant strains." He also said that the number of treatment centers in the country has been increased to 1,800 because many patients have to walk to them.

Health workers and advocates are concerned that if the spread of MDR-TB is not brought under control in Kenya, the country could experience an outbreak of extensively drug-resistant TB, TB that is resistant to the two most potent first-line treatments and some of the available second-line drugs. Some Kenyan medical experts said recently that Kenya and its surrounding region lack the capacity to handle XDR-TB if the disease spreads to the region.

Source: Kaiser Family Foundation
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Am an MDR- TB patient at Kenyatta am on my elevent month of treatment and improving drastically, but one thing I have noted is that the MDR patients needs to have a well suplimentd diet inorder to overcome the medicine reactions since they are so strong. I personaly experinced it at first but when I was advised to combine with food suppliment am doing very well, but some medical offices discourage thier clients instead of advising them use if they can afford. You get that our eating habbit is not well spread at end of the day we make so many omitions. From my personal experience as and an MDR pantient I recommend other patients to use GNLD suppliments for more experience meet me at Kenyatta National Hosital MDR-TB Tent and much thanks to our medical staffs at the MDR-TB Tent Kenyatta National Hopsital

Walter Orina.

orina Monday, June 1, 2009

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