Activity Added to Video Games can Fight Fat, Shows Mayo Clinic

by Medindia Content Team on  January 6, 2007 at 11:34 AM Research News   - G J E 4
Activity Added to Video Games can Fight Fat, Shows Mayo Clinic
It's a known fact, that kids who are addicted to video games are mostly sedentary and end up being obese . Researchers from Mayo Clinic have come up with an interesting tactic to battle this problem. They have contemplated creating video games that are designed to make kids who play them, to be more active. These games ensure that the kid's burn more calories than they would, by playing conventional screen games .This study has been published by the medical journal Pediatrics. Lorraine Lanningham-Foster, Ph.D., from Mayo obesity research centre is the study leader. "The point is that children -- very focused on screen games -- can be made healthier if activity is a required part of the game, she said."

The study is the first to scientifically measure the energy spent playing video games. While the study's scope is small -- only 25 children -- it was conducted with great accuracy. Fifteen children were of normal weight for their height and frame; 10 were mildly obese. Both groups were tested while sitting and watching television, playing a traditional video game, playing two types of activity-required video games, and watching television while walking on a treadmill.

The results showed that sitting while watching television and playing traditional video games expended the same amount of energy. When participants played with the first activity-oriented video game, one that uses a camera to virtually "place" them in the game where they catch balls and other objects, their energy expenditure tripled. The result was the same for the lean and mildly obese children. Experts point out that, walking on a treadmill while watching TV also tripled expenditure for the lean group, but showed a nearly fivefold increase for the mildly obese group. While using a dance video game, both groups burned the most calories, but it was considerably more for the obese group -- just over six times more than sitting still.

Screen time (both TV and video games) now averages eight hours a day among children. The Mayo researchers suggest requiring activity in more video and computer games is one potential approach for reversing the obesity trend. Despite the small sample in this study, the researchers consider the findings robust and say that they warrant further studies in randomized trials.

Source: Eurekalert

Post your Comments

Comments should be on the topic and should not be abusive. The editorial team reserves the right to review and moderate the comments posted on the site.
User Avatar
* Your comment can be maximum of 2500 characters
Notify me when reply is posted I agree to the terms and conditions

You May Also Like

View All