Girls Fantasise About Sex Better Than Boys Do: Study

by Bidita Debnath on  April 12, 2014 at 11:08 PM Research News   - G J E 4
It's not just teenage boys who fantasise about sex, but teenage girls also fantasise about sex in the same fashion, and better.

There is no difference between boys and girls when it comes to what types of sex they fantasise about, research reveals.
Girls Fantasise About Sex Better Than Boys Do: Study
Girls Fantasise About Sex Better Than Boys Do: Study

Also, there are no differences in the proportion of girls and boys who think that their sexual behaviour is influenced by pornography to a great extent.

Boys and girls who watch pornography have a more favourable attitude to pornography than those who do not, the researchers commented.

"Among the most sexually-experienced adolescents, there was a perception that girls and boys are equally interested in sex which is a positive finding from the perspective of gender equality," explained Magdalena Mattebo from Uppsala University in Sweden.

Mattebo investigated the sexual experiences and pornography consumption of more than 800, 16-year-old Swedish upper-secondary school students.

It was unexpected that more than every 10th girl in the group stated that they watch pornography less than they would like to.

"It was also unexpected that there was no difference between girls and boys regarding fantasies about sexual acts," Mattebo added.

An equal proportion of girls and boys said that pornography influences their sexual behaviour.

The girls in the study were more sexually experienced than the boys when it comes to oral, vaginal and anal sex.

But there were no differences between them concerning various types of sexual partners such as buddy sex, one-night-stands and group sex, the study noted.

Based on traditional stereotyped gender roles, it was not surprising that the adolescents in the study had a more favourable attitude to boys having many different sex partners compared to the attitude towards girls having many different sex partner.

The study has been published in Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics.

Source: IANS

Post your Comments

Comments should be on the topic and should not be abusive. The editorial team reserves the right to review and moderate the comments posted on the site.
User Avatar
* Your comment can be maximum of 2500 characters
Notify me when reply is posted I agree to the terms and conditions