Time Pressure Linked to Lesser Happiness in Shopaholic Teens

by Tanya Thomas on  October 23, 2011 at 7:28 PM Lifestyle News   - G J E 4
What materialistic young people with compulsive buying issues need, new research believes, is just the right amount of spare time to feel happier.
 Time Pressure Linked to Lesser Happiness in Shopaholic Teens
Time Pressure Linked to Lesser Happiness in Shopaholic Teens

Chris Manolis and James Roberts from Xavier University in Cincinnati, OH and Baylor University in Waco, TX say that the perception of a shortage of time, or time pressure, is linked to lower levels of happiness.

At the same time, our consumer culture, characterized by materialism and compulsive buying, also has an effect on people's happiness: the desire for materialistic possessions leads to lower life satisfaction.

Given the importance of time in contemporary life, Manolis and Roberts investigate, for the first time, the effect of perceived time affluence (the amount of spare time one perceives he or she has) on the consequences of materialistic values and compulsive buying for adolescent well-being.

A total of 1,329 adolescents from a public high school in a large metropolitan area of the Midwestern United States took part in the study.

The researchers measured how much spare time the young people thought they had; the extent to which they held materialistic values and had compulsive buying tendencies; and their subjective well-being, or self-rated happiness.

Manolis and Roberts' findings confirm that both materialism and compulsive buying have a negative impact on teenagers' happiness. The more materialistic they are and the more they engage in compulsive buying, the lower their happiness levels.

In addition, time affluence moderates the negative consequences of both materialism and compulsive buying in this group. Specifically, moderate time affluence i.e. being neither too busy, nor having too much spare time, is linked to higher levels of happiness in materialistic teenagers and those who are compulsive buyers.

Those who suffer from time pressures and think materialistically and/or purchase compulsively feel less happy compared with their adolescent counterparts. Equally, having too much free time on their hands exacerbates the negative effects of material values and compulsive buying on adolescent happiness.

"Living with a sensible, balanced amount of free time promotes well-being not only directly, but also by helping to alleviate some of the negative side effects associated with living in our consumer-orientated society," the authors conclude.

The study has been published in the journal Applied Research in Quality of Life.

Source: ANI

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