About My Health Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Study Examines Risk Factors Linked With Cerebral Palsy and Infant Death

by Kathy Jones on September 12, 2013 at 9:12 PM
Font : A-A+

 Study Examines Risk Factors Linked With Cerebral Palsy and Infant Death

A joint study conducted by researchers from National Institutes of Health, University of Sydney, the University of Western Australia and Sydney Adventist Hospital is currently investigating how much four specific risk factors contributed to cerebral palsy and young infant death.

The risk factors were asphyxial birth events (incidences during labor and delivery that had the potential to interfere with oxygen getting to the newborn's brain), inflammation (signs of infection), birth defects, and poor fetal growth (low birth weight plus some other factors related to expected size).

Advertisement

Cerebral palsy is a group of neurological disorders that appear in early childhood and affect body movement and muscle coordination. Movement problems associated with cerebral palsy include dyskinesia (uncontrollable writhing or jerky movements) and spastic quadriplegia (severe stiffness in the limbs).

In this study, published in Obstetrics & Gynecology, the researchers compared the medical records of children with cerebral palsy and infants who died within 1 month of birth with the records of healthy children to identify how often the risk factors occurred in the groups.
Advertisement

Among the cerebral palsy and infant death cases, birth defects and poor fetal growth were the most common risk factors. Birth defects and/or poor fetal growth were seen in almost half of the cerebral palsy cases. In addition, out of the four risk factors, only birth defects and/or poor fetal growth predicted dyskinesia or quadriplegia.

Many studies looking into the causes of cerebral palsy have concentrated on asphyxial birth events. However, the current findings indicate that poor fetal growth and birth defects may greatly contribute to cerebral palsy and infant death, suggesting that research should focus more on those specific risk factors.



Source: Eurekalert
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
News Category
What's New on Medindia
Breast Cancer Awareness Month 2021 - It's time to RISE
First-Ever Successful Pig-To-Human Kidney Transplantation
World Osteoporosis Day 2021 -
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Sudden Infant Death Syndrome / Cot Death LASIK Eye Surgery Death Facts Cerebral Palsy Hamstring Lengthening Surgery Rhizotomy Paralysis Facial Nerve Decompression Monoplegia 

Recommended Reading
Bell's Palsy
Bell''s palsy is facial nerve disorder that causes weakness of the muscles on one side of the face. ...
Cord Blood Stem Cells Used to Successfully Treat a Boy With Cerebral Palsy
A 2-year old boy, who suffered from cardiac arrest and brain damage, was successfully treated for .....
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral palsy is a non-progressive motor neurological disorder that manifests during the early deve...
LASIK Eye Surgery
Lasik / Laser eye surgery is a treatment, which improves the vision in patients suffering from eye p...
Monoplegia
Monoplegia is the paralysis of one of the four limbs. It commonly affects the arms. It is mainly cau...
Paralysis
Paralysis is a condition where there is a loss of muscle function as well as sensory loss, which can...
Sudden Infant Death Syndrome / Cot Death
Sudden Infant Death Syndrome is death of a baby, under one year of age that occurs in sleep and cann...

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2021

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use