About My Health Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Role of Primitive Gut in Left-Right Patterning

by Kathy Jones on March 8, 2012 at 8:34 PM
Font : A-A+

 Role of Primitive Gut in Left-Right Patterning

Information that determines whether organs develop in the stereotypical left-right pattern may be propagated by the gut endoderm, scientists have revealed.

Their findings are published 6 March 2012 in the online, open-access journal PLoS Biology.

Advertisement

Superficially, we appear bilaterally symmetrical. Nonetheless, the stereotypical placement of our organs reveals a stereotypical internal asymmetry. For example, the heart is located on the left, while the liver is located on the right side. How this inherent left-right asymmetry is established is an area of interest, because of both its intrinsic biological significance, as well as for its medical applications.

In the mouse, which is an experimentally tractable mammalian model system, a body of work has shown that the initial event that breaks left-right symmetry occurs at the node, a specialized organ located in the midline of the developing embryo. How this initial asymmetry at the node leads to a cascade of events propagating laterality information to a distant location within the embryo has been a major question in the field for over a decade. Previous experiments have shown that this cascade results in the activation of a genetic circuit on the left side of the embryo, ultimately leading to asymmetric organ formation. If the cascade fails to be propagated, left-right asymmetry fails to be established.
Advertisement

Kat Hadjantonakis and colleagues at the Sloan-Kettering Institute of the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York now report that the asymmetric signals generated at the node are transferred to the extremity of the embryo across an epithelium residing on the embryo's surface. This epithelium, the gut endoderm, is the tissue containing the progenitor cells for the epithelial lining of the respiratory and digestive tracts and associated organs such as lungs, liver and pancreas.

Hadjantonakis and colleagues noted that mouse embryos lacking the HMG domain-containing transcription factor Sox17 exhibit defects in the formation of the gut endoderm and subsequently fail to establish left-right asymmetry. They went on to demonstrate that cell-to-cell communication across gap junctions located within the gut endoderm epithelium is the mechanism of left-right information relay.



Source: Eurekalert
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Advertisement
News Category
What's New on Medindia
Effect of Blood Group Type on COVID-19 Risk and Severity
Woman with Rare Spinal Cord Defect from Birth Sues Doctor
Toothache
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Probiotics - Support System for the Gut Leaky Gut Syndrome 

Recommended Reading
Genetic Counseling
Encyclopedia section of medindia gives general info about Genetic counseling ...
Genetic Testing of Diseases
Genetic testing helps to confirm a genetic condition in an individual and involves q complex ......
Epigenetics
In the recent years 'epigenetics' represents inheritable changes in gene expression that do not ......
Leaky Gut Syndrome
Leaky gut syndrome is a condition caused by increased intestinal permeability of the gut. It resembl...
Probiotics - Support System for the Gut
Probiotics are live microorganisms that resemble the “good bacteria” in our gut. Science is yet to f...

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2021

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use