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Robot 'Prostitutes' May Feature As Part Of Extreme Future Plans For Tourists, Says Expert

by Aruna on August 20, 2009 at 11:04 AM
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Robot 'Prostitutes' May Feature As Part Of Extreme Future Plans For Tourists, Says Expert

A tourism conference has been told that robot 'prostitutes' may feature as part of extreme future plans for tourists.

Ian Yeoman, from New Zealand's University of Wellington, gave a sneak peak to what the world may hold in 2050, formed by factors like global warming, food, water and jet fuel supply problems and technological advances.

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The tourism futurologist said one could witness a return to mass tourism with a series of new indoor tourism products, thanks to revolutionary technology.

The expert said the idea of robot waiters at cocktail bars, remote-controlled camera-carrying guard dogs in hotel lobbies, and self-cleaning hotel rooms could not be ruled out.
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"Robotics will become important, because you're going to have labor shortages in the future. You'll have some sort of interaction in terms of robots doing certain types of mundane activities," Adelaide Now quoted him as saying.

Dr. Yeoman added that even robot "prostitutes" that would not pass on diseases like HIV could emerge, though he added: "But you're talking about extreme futures."

Source: ANI
ARU
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