About Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Risk of Uterine Cancer Recurrence Increased If Radiation Therapy is Delayed After Hysterectomy

by Kathy Jones on November 4, 2012 at 10:31 AM
Font : A-A+

 Risk of Uterine Cancer Recurrence Increased If Radiation Therapy is Delayed After Hysterectomy

A new study from researchers at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit says that the risk of uterine cancer recurrence may be increased by waiting too long after a hysterectomy to begin radiation therapy.

The study shows that for patients with uterine cancer not receiving chemotherapy, tumors were more likely to return if radiation therapy was delayed nine weeks or longer following surgery, with only 43 percent having relapse-free survival after five years.

Advertisement

By comparison, patients starting radiation treatment soon after surgery had a five-year relapse-free survival of 90 percent.

"Our data suggests that a shorter interval of time between hysterectomy and start of radiation treatment may be beneficial for patients," says lead author Mohamed Elshaikh, M.D., senior staff physician in the Department of Radiation Oncology at Henry Ford Hospital.
Advertisement

Study results will be presented Tuesday, Oct. 30 at the 54th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) in Boston.

Endometrial cancers mainly arise from the tissue lining the uterus. They are the most common gynecologic cancers in the U.S., with more than 43,000 women diagnosed and an estimated 7,950 dying from the disease in 2010, according to the National Cancer Institute.

A total hysterectomy (surgical removal of the uterus) is the most common approach for treatment of endometrial cancers.

To assess the impact of time between hysterectomy and the start of radiation treatment on tumor recurrence, Dr. Elshaikh and his colleagues conducted a retrospective study of patients who underwent surgery for uterine cancer between 1988 and 2010.

Of the 1,450 Henry Ford patients reviewed with stage I-III uterine cancer, 308 received radiation therapy without chemotherapy after hysterectomy with at least one year follow-up. The median age for patients was 65 and the median follow-up was six years.

About 75 percent of the study group started radiation therapy less than nine weeks after surgery, while the others began treatment nine weeks or more after surgery.

Among the study group, there were 43 cases where the cancer returned. Tumor recurrence was significantly associated with treatment delay of nine weeks or longer.

Along with Dr. Elshaikh, Henry Ford study co-authors are Richard Cattaneo II, M.D.; Gordon Jacobsen, MS; and Rabbie Hanna, M.D.

Source: Newswise
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
What's New on Medindia
Top 10 Vitamin B12 Foods for Vegetarians - Slideshow
Targeted Screening Program Beneficial for Prostate Cancer Screening
Are Menopause Symptoms Troubling You?: Try these Options
View all
Recommended Reading
News Archive
Date
Category
Advertisement
News Category

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Radiotherapy X-Ray Cancer and Homeopathy Hysterectomy Endometrial Cancer Hodgkins Lymphoma Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma Reiki and Pranic Healing Cancer Facts Cancer 

Most Popular on Medindia

The Essence of Yoga How to Reduce School Bag Weight - Simple Tips Color Blindness Calculator Sanatogen Iron Intake Calculator Post-Nasal Drip Nutam (400mg) (Piracetam) Turmeric Powder - Health Benefits, Uses & Side Effects A-Z Drug Brands in India Drug Side Effects Calculator

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2022

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use